Solo Travel in Morocco: 9 Things Essential Tips

Morocco may not be the first place you think of when planning a solo trip, but solo travel in Morocco can be amazing to say the least.

There are a ton of rumours about Morocco and have it isn’t safe for solo female travellers.

While there may be some truth in the fact that Morocco isn’t like Europe, and there are different customs and culture, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t plan a solo trip to Morocco.

That being said, it might not be the best place for your first solo trip, but once you have some experience travelling alone, Morocco should definitely be added to the list of places you want to go!

Morocco is a beautiful country with amazing things do so, see, and eat.

If you’re wondering if solo travel in Morocco is right for you, keep reading! Hopefully this article will give you a better idea of what to expect when travelling alone in Morocco.

Is Marrakech safe for solo female travellers?!

1. It’s Really Easy to Travel Around Morocco

A lot of people have this idea that Morocco is a difficult country to travel in, but that simply isn’t the case.

Morocco has a great train and bus system that can easily get you from one city to another. This makes it very easy for solo travellers to see more than one city in Morocco.

However, one important thing to note is that the buses and trains are often very busy, and tickets sell out fast.

You may want to go to the bus or train station a day or two before you travel to a new city to secure your seat. If you don’t, you may have to wait a little while for the next bus or train to depart.

Buses and trains run on a regular basis, so you won’t have to wait long.

Here are a few transportation guides I’ve written to help you figure out how to travel between cities in Morocco:

In terms of getting around within cities in Morocco, that’s pretty easy too!

I’ve found that most cities in Morocco are very walkable. I walked everywhere and didn’t have to rely on public transportation.

If you want to go somewhere that is beyond a distance you feel comfortable walking, there are lots of local buses, or you can take a taxi.

Just be sure to either agree on a price before you get in a taxi or demand they turn on their meter. This will ensure you get a fair price.

But, all in all, getting around Morocco is very easy and not something you have to worry about when you’re on a solo trip to Morocco.

Rabat, Morocco

2. You Need to Exchange Money Inside Morocco

One of the most important things you need to know when planning solo travel in Morocco is that it’s extremely difficult to access Moroccan Dirham (MAD) outside of Morocco.

You’re going to have to exchange your currency inside Morocco (likely at the airport).

Exchange however much you think you’ll need and then a little bit more just in case you fall in love with a few extra souvenirs or eat more than you anticipated.

If you have any MAD left over at the end of your trip, you can exchange it back into a variety of currencies at the airport.

You often get the best rate if you exchange it into Euros so keep that in mind. If you’re going to Europe next or planning a trip to Europe in the near future, you’ll probably want to exchange your MAD into Euro rather than your local currency.

I have heard of some banks giving you a very small amount of MAD before you arrive in Morocco.

I had one coworker who was able to get about $100 CAD worth of MAD from a Canadian bank inside Canada.

That would be enough to tide you over if something went wrong at the airport or if you arrived when the exchange places were closed.

I wouldn’t rely on being able to do that though and would expect to have to exchange all your currency inside Morocco.

3. The Food is Delicious

One of the biggest surprises for me the first time I went to Morocco was how incredible the food was.

I didn’t know what to expect and didn’t have any preconceived ideas of what the food would be like when I arrived in Morocco, and I was blown away by how delicious everything I ate was.

I even brought home a tajine, so I could make Moroccan food at home!

One of the most important things to do during solo travel in Morocco is indulge in the local cuisine.

Don’t be afraid to eat at a restaurant alone and don’t be afraid to try the local food even if you’ve never heard of it before.

Trying new food is one of the best parts of travel, and you don’t want to miss out on it in Morocco!

If you don’t know where to go, be sure to ask someone at your hotel or hostel. They’ll be able to point you in the right direction.

Tips for eating alone at restaurants

Marrakech, Morocco

4. You’ll Probably Get Some Extra Attention

I hate to say this because I don’t like playing into stereotypes, but I want to give you a realistic idea of what solo travel in Morocco might look like.

Or at least what my perspective was as a young, white, blonde woman.

Unfortunately, as a solo female traveller in Morocco, you’ll likely get some extra attention.

It’s important to note that not all of it is unwanted advances or sexual in any way. Oftentimes, it’s just people noticing you’re alone and hoping they can “help” you in whatever you need and be tipped.

If someone is following you or asking to help you, confidentially say no thank you and keep walking.

Some people might still try to “help” you and others will move on to “help” another tourist. The important thing is to keep moving and stand your ground that you don’t need help.

I’ve had a couple of situations where a man walked me all the way to my riad front door and wouldn’t leave without a tip. These situations are few and far between. If that happens, I think it is just better to give them a small amount of money rather than getting into an argument.

Now, in terms of the souks and markets. That’s where I’ve found the unwanted attention to be at it’s worst.

Again. This is just my experience, and I’m not saying this to demonize a certain culture or anything like that. It’s just so you’re prepared.

I found that in the souks, people are more inclined to try to get your attention by cat calling.

This is likely a sales tactic to get your attention and try to lure you into their stall. The best thing you can do is keep walking and not interact if you don’t want to.

All things considered, I think solo travel in Morocco is very safe, and if a little unwanted attention is what you have to put up with to explore this beautiful country, then that’s a small price to pay.

I’ve never felt unsafe when people approached me in Morocco. The people are incredibly kind.

Even if a stranger is following you to your riad, they likely want a tip and aren’t interested in harming you in any way!

5. Never Look Lost

This tip goes hand in hand with the last one.

I personally think it is best to never look lost in Morocco even if you are. Looking lost will make people want to come up and help you, and if you’re like me, that just causes even more stress.

So, keep your map in your bag or pocket and walk like you know exactly where you’re going.

If you do happen to be lost, pop into a corner shop, café, hotel, or restaurant to look at your map and ask for directions if you need to.

This may be a bit overkill, but I prefer it to looking lost on the streets and potentially having multiple people come up to me to “help”.

You may not be as introverted as I am and not mind the help, but if you’re like me and find a situation like that stressful, never look lost.

Essaouira, Morocco

6. Internet Safety is Key

Just like any country in the world, on a solo trip to Morocco you’re going to be relying on public wifi to access the internet.

The problem with public wifi is that anybody can access it, and if someone wants, they can access your personal online information and data.

I’m talking banking information, social media passwords. Anything you can think of can be stolen if you’re not being internet safe.

The only way to be internet safe when using public wifi networks is by installing a VPN on your devices.

A VPN essentially puts up an imaginary forcefield around your devices that makes it impossible for someone to access your online information when you’re using a public wifi network.

It makes using public wifi just as safe as using your home wifi where you’re the only person who knows the password.

My Favourite VPN

I’ve used a lot of different VPNs over my years of travel, and, frankly, most of them suck.

VPNs are notorious for slowing down your internet speed, which is not what you want when travelling. It makes using the internet frustrating.

The reason I love NordVPN and continue to use it year in and year out is because they’re the fastest VPN on the market.

You don’t even notice that you’re using a VPN because your internet connection isn’t slowed down!

The best part is you can protect up to six devices with one NordVPN subscription. You can protect all your devices for one low fee.

The price of a two-year NordVPN subscription costs less per month than a single Starbucks latte.

With prices like that, you can’t afford to not protect your online information.

My philosophy is that if you can afford to travel, you can afford to install a VPN on your devices and keep your online information safe.

7. Be Prepared to Haggle

One of the things you need to know about solo travel in Morocco is that you’re going to have to haggle.

You’ll need to haggle when purchasing souvenirs and if you take a taxi somewhere.

It isn’t a big deal, but if you’re like me, haggling just feels uncomfortable and awkward. I know it’s a cultural thing, and lots of people do it. I was born and raised in Canada though, so I’m not used to haggling.

Haggling can become even more awkward and uncomfortable if you’re travelling alone.

But it’s something you need to be prepared for. Otherwise you’ll be way overpaying.

You’ll likely still be paying more than a local would unless you’re really good at haggling, but at least you’re not paying an absurd amount more than you should be.

Now if you’re like me and are terrible at haggling, here’s an article that’ll give you some tips on how to haggle properly.

The challenge is putting them into practice though!

A tourist’s guide to wifi in Morocco

8. Be Aware of Local Scams

Just like anywhere else in the world, there are local scams you need to be aware of during a solo trip to Morocco.

The local scams aren’t just pick pocketing, and there are some larger scams you need to be aware of. Some of them seem so innocent that you don’t realize you’ve been scammed until it happens.

This article outlines the top scams in Morocco, and I definitely recommend you give it a read.

If you don’t have time to read that article, here are a few of the top ones you need to be aware of:

  • The carpet scam where you’re invited to have a drink of tea then the store owner gets upset that you didn’t purchase a rug and drank his/her tea.
  • Fake goods (such as saffron) being sold as if there were the real thing.
  • Inflated prices for camel rides (be sure to book online rather than with someone randomly on the street).
  • Live animal photos. Someone demands you take a picture with their animal and then demands payment after you take the photo.

Just be safe when you travel alone in Morocco.

Use your best judgement. If something seems too good to be true, it probably is. If something seems sketchy, it probably is.

Listen to your gut.

Rabat, Morocco

9. You Can’t Enter Mosques Unless You’re Muslim

This last one technically isn’t a tip specific to solo travel in Morocco, but it’s still important to know.

Unless you’re Muslim, you’re not allowed to tour the mosques.

There is a mosque in Marrakech that sometimes allows non-Muslims to tour it depending on the time of day and what other functions are going on that day. It isn’t a guarantee though.

I tell you this to hopefully prevent you from accidentally embarrassing yourself if you try to enter a mosque just to tour it.

A lot of us are used to being able to tour any religious building we want. It’s very common in Europe, Asia, and North America to walk into a religious building without practicing that religion and just tour it.

We can sometimes take that for granted and think that’s the case everywhere we travel, but it isn’t in Morocco.

Knowing this information will help you respect the local culture and save yourself a little bit of embarrassment.

There are lots of other amazing things to do and see in Morocco that not being able to tour a mosque won’t make you feel like you’re missing out.

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Conclusion

There you go! All my top tips and tricks for solo travel in Morocco.

Hopefully this guide helped give you a picture of what solo travel in Morocco is like and help you decide whether or not Morocco is the right place for you to visit alone.

I really liked Morocco and am obsessed with their food to say the least, but it was definitely a culture shock when I visited.

I had only been to European and North American cities at that point in my travel career, and Morocco was definitely a different experience.

It took a little bit of getting used to, but it was a different experience in the best way possible.

If you’re up for an adventure and an amazing experience, Morocco might just be the perfect place for you!

Is Prague Safe for Solo Female Travellers?!

Prague is quickly becoming one of the most popular cities in Europe for tourists to visit, but is Prague safe for solo female travellers?

With the influx of tourists, there has been a steep increase in the number of petty crimes in Prague in recent years.

But that doesn’t mean Prague isn’t safe.

In fact, the answer to the question is Prague safe is yes!

I’ve been to Prague as a solo female traveller and at no time did I not feel safe. That doesn’t mean you can go to Prague and not have your wits about you.

You need to be aware of your surroundings and protect your personal belongings. Pick pocketing is a major issue in Prague, and when you’re packing into the crowds in Prague’s Old Town, you’re a pretty easy target.

Outside of petty theft, you don’t really have much to worry about as a solo traveller in Prague.

The risk of being a victim of violent crime is very low.

So, if you’re wondering if Prague is safe for you as a solo traveller and that is the only thing holding you back from booking the trip, you’ll be happy to know you don’t really have to worry about safety in Prague more than anywhere else you travel.

Solo travel in Prague

Is Prague Safe?

Just in case you skimmed the intro, I just want to reiterate that Prague is safe for solo female travellers.

There aren’t any major safety concerns in Prague that should make you wary of visiting the city.

As long as you take normal safety precautions while you’re there, you should be just fine!

Prague, Czechia

Prague Safety Tips

Even though Prague is safe, there are still a few safety tips you should know to make sure you’re as safe as you can be while travelling in Prague.

Most of these are generic safety tips you should be following no matter where you’re travelling to.

It’s always good to have a refresher though!

Beware of Pick Pockets

As I mentioned in the intro, the biggest threat you have as a solo traveller in Prague is the risk of being pick pocketed.

Pick pocketing is on the rise in Prague, and it is something you need to be aware of. There are tons of crowds in the main tourist area of Prague, and tourists are easy pickings for pick pocketers.

The good news is that it is super easy to reduce your chances of being pick pocketed.

The most important thing you need to do is always keep your purse or bag in front of you and not hanging at the back of your hip.

Better yet, keep a hand on your purse as often as you can.

This will make it extremely difficult for pick pocketers to easily access your bag, and they’ll move onto another target.

Additionally, try to keep your wallet, phone, and passport in zipper compartments within your purse or bag to add another layer of security.

Finally, if someone distracts you, be sure to keep your hand on your bag and your bag in sight. This is sometimes a scam where multiple people are working together.

One person distracts you (by asking if you dropped something or something along those lines), and their partner picks your pocket when you’re not looking.

Tips for travelling alone for the first time

Prague, Czechia

Be Internet Safe

One of the biggest threats to you when you travel is using public wifi. Not enough people talk about it, but it can seriously put you at risk.

When you travel, you rely a lot on public wifi.

You use it at your hotel, at restaurants, and when you’re out and about. The problem with public wifi is that anybody can access it, and if someone wants, they can steal your online data.

You may be thinking that you’re using public wifi safely because you’re only using wifi that has a password.

That’s not good enough.

Anybody can access the password and use the public wifi network.

The only way to protect your online information and data when you’re travelling is by installing a VPN on your devices.

A VPN puts a forcefield around your devices that makes it impossible for a hacker to access your private data and information. Even if you’re using a public wifi network.

A VPN makes using public wifi just as safe as using your home wifi where you’re the only person who knows the password.

It’s a basic safety thing you need to be doing every single time you travel. You don’t want to risk having your online information stolen from you!

My Favourite VPN

The problem with VPNs is that they’re known for slowing down your internet connection and making browsing the internet a frustrating experience.

I’ve used a number of VPNs during my years of travel and pretty much hated them all.

The only one I’ve enjoyed (and the only one I’ve renewed my subscription with) is NordVPN.

It’s the fastest VPN on the market, and it doesn’t feel like you’re using a VPN when you’re browsing the internet. And we all know how important it is to be able to use the internet to research and plan your days when you’re on the road.

The speed of NordVPN is why I love it and recommend it to my fellow travel lovers like you.

There is no other product on the market that is close to as good as NordVPN (in my opinion).

Plus you can connect and protect up to six devices with one NordVPN subscription. You can protect all your devices for one low price!

A two-year subscription to NordVPN costs less per month than a single Starbucks latte. With prices like that, you don’t have an excuse not to protect your online data when you travel.

My philosophy is that if you can afford to travel, you can afford to protect yourself with a VPN.

Check Your Restaurant Bills Closely

Unfortunately, some restaurants (especially in touristy areas) try to get a little bit of extra money out of tourists, so you need to read your bill closely before paying.

Some restaurants include a tip or service charge in the bill and make a note at the bottom of the bill about the suggested tip amount.

People who aren’t reading their bill properly will see the suggested tip amount and pay it without realizing that the tip was already included in the price of the bill.

In fact, tipping isn’t necessarily customary or expected in Prague.

It’s becoming more expected as more tourists flock in, but if you’re outside the touristy areas, tips aren’t expected.

If you do tip, round up to the nearest 100 Koruna or tip between 5% and 10%.

But, if there is a service charge or tip included in the price of your bill, you don’t need to tip on top of that.

Technically, the restaurants aren’t doing anything illegal, but it can be very misleading to tourists.

The moral of the story is to read your bill carefully before paying it!

What I wish I knew before backpacking Europe alone

Prague, Czechia

Be Careful Walking Home in the Dark

Just like any city in the world, walking home alone in the dark can put women on edge.

Prague is a party city, and it’s easy to stay out late and then have to find your way home in the dark.

Your best option is to just catch a taxi, but if you choose to walk, be extra careful and aware of your surroundings.

Walk on main streets with lots of light, walk quickly, keep your head on a swivel, and keep your bag close.

Basic safety precautions like that will help you feel safer walking home alone and get home safely.

Don’t Overindulge in Alcohol

As I mentioned, Prague is a party city, and it’s easy to get caught up in the fun, but please don’t drink too much.

Especially as a solo traveller.

You’re 100% responsible for your safety and getting back to your hotel safely. You don’t have a friend watching out for you.

My rule of thumb is to have two drinks maximum and then stick to water. You can still have fun, but it’s much safer for you.

You know your own limits.

Your solo trip to Prague is not the time or place to test them.

Prague, Czechia

Conclusion

I hope this post answers the question is Prague safe?

I’ve been to Prague as a solo female traveller and felt safe the entire time, and I hope you feel safe in Prague as well.

As more and more tourists flock to Prague, petty crime will continue to increase, but (hopefully) there won’t be a rise in violent crime.

It’s up to you to make sure you’re aware of your surroundings and not putting yourself at risk of being robbed (or something worse).

As long as you follow basic safety precautions that you should be following everywhere you travel, you shouldn’t have an issue in Prague.

So, is Prague safe for solo female travellers?

I’m happy to report that it is!

9 Key Things to Know Before Your Solo Trip to Ireland

Ireland isn’t always the first place when you think of places to visit in Europe. However, that doesn’t mean taking a solo trip to Ireland isn’t amazing.

Because it is!

Ireland has some of the most beautiful natural landmarks and some of the more unique man-made landmarks in Europe.

There is an excellent combination of nature, nerd culture, history, architecture, and pubs.

There truly is something for everybody in Ireland!

If you’ve been considering a solo trip to Ireland but aren’t quite sure if it’s the right destination for you or not, hopefully this article can help you out.

We cover the most important things you need to know before taking a solo trip to Ireland.

Some of the things on this list you may not have considered before, and they might convince you travel alone in Ireland.

Or they may make you decide Ireland isn’t the right place for you.

Either way, I hope you find this article helpful!

Best European countries for solo female travellers

1. Ireland is More Expensive than You Think

I think maybe because it’s neighbour the UK has a reputation for being so expensive people think that Ireland is more affordable.

Well, unfortunately, I have news you don’t want to hear.

Ireland is just as expensive (and in some cases more expensive) than the UK. You’re not getting a budget holiday if you choose to go on a solo trip to Ireland.

In fact, I find that accommodation (especially in Dublin) is more expensive than in London, which is saying a lot if you know how expensive London can be!

There isn’t anything wrong with going to a country where it is more expensive, but I want you to be prepared.

I don’t want you to think Ireland is more affordable than the UK and then show up without enough money and be stuck in a jam.

You’re travelling alone, and it’s 100% your responsibility to make sure you can afford to cover every single cent the trip will cost you.

If you nixed out the UK for your trip because of the price, you may want to reconsider going to Ireland.

I certainly was under the impression Ireland was more affordable than it actually is, and it messed up my entire budget for that trip.

Cork, Ireland

2. Weigh the Pros and Cons of Renting a Car

A lot of people rent a car and drive around Ireland. It’s an amazing experience, but it isn’t for everybody.

As a solo traveller, you really need to weigh the pros and cons of renting a car in Ireland and decide what is the best decision for you.

You have to be completely comfortable driving alone in a foreign country.

Pros of Renting a Car in Ireland

  • Freedom to go wherever you want whenever you want
  • You can see some of the more obscure, off the beaten track locations
  • See more of the country
  • You can tour alone and not rely on guided tours to visit attractions outside major cities

Cons of Renting a Car in Ireland

  • You have to drive on the left-hand side of the road
  • Renting an automatic car is expensive if you don’t know how to drive manual
  • Need to make sure you have car insurance (either through your credit card or purchasing car insurance when you rent your car)
  • You’re 100% responsible for all the driving
Medieval castle on the seaside, Ireland

The Bottom Line

The way I see it, it comes down to how comfortable you are with driving (and driving on the left-hand side of the road).

If you’re like me and don’t like driving and driving on the left-hand side of the road makes you nervous, it might be better to not rent a car and rely on guided tours to visit attractions outside of major cities.

If you’re confident in your driving abilities, renting a car is a great choice.

When it comes down to the cost of it, it’s pretty much a saw off between the cost of renting a car and the cost of going on guided day tours.

Your enjoyment and mental health matters more so choose whatever makes you feel most comfortable!

3. Get Outside Dublin

It’s tempting to stay in Dublin and not venture out into the rest of the country, but that’s one of the biggest mistakes you can make on your solo trip to Ireland.

Dublin is a great city, but there is so much more to see outside the capital city.

Even if you just take a few day trips from Dublin to see something else, that’ll give you a better idea of what Ireland is about than just staying in Dublin.

In a perfect world, I suggest visiting two or three cities in Ireland on your solo trip (or renting a car and driving around for a week or two), but I know that isn’t possible for everybody.

But, please promise me that you’ll at least take a day trip!

There are tons to choose from depending on what you’re interested in.

You can explore nature, see famous filming locations, visit Northern Ireland, and so on and so forth.

The possibilities are endless!

You can do a lot of the day trips yourself, or you can pay for a guided day trip. Whatever your personal preference is!

The important thing is you get outside Dublin and see more of Ireland!

Dublin, Ireland

4. It’s Colder Than You Think (Even in Summer)

One of the things that surprised me the most on my first solo trip to Ireland is how cold it is.

I went in May and thought it would be nice and warm and that a jacket wasn’t needed.

I was very wrong!

It’s surprisingly cool in Ireland even during the warmer months. They get a lot of rain, and the wind cuts right through you.

I have a friend who lives in Dublin now, and she says when it’s nice it’s nice, but when it’s cold, it’s cold. No matter what time of year it is, and you never know what it isn’t going to be nice.

So, be more prepared than I was and pack some warmer sweaters and possibly even a light coat. Preferably one that is water resistant.

But, the moral of the story is to pack something warm. You don’t want to be stuck buying warm clothes in Ireland.

Especially if you’re on a tight budget!

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5. Don’t Drink Too Much

I know it’s tempting to go for drinks and have a good time when in Ireland.

There are so many good pubs!

But you really need to be careful.

It’s so easy to go a little crazy and get yourself in a bad situation.

Trust me. I know from experience!

You can go out for a few pints and then find yourself stumbling home at 2am. That’s not the best situation even if your home city, but it can be even worse when you’re travelling.

And travelling alone.

My top safety recommendation for you on your solo trip to Ireland is to have a drinking limit and stay within it.

Don’t give into the temptation to have an extra drink. One extra drink leads to another and another, and next thing you know, you’re puking on the sidewalk.

Again, true story.

So, please be safe and drink responsibly.

And also take into account that you’re likely a bit dehydrated from walking around all day, and that will impact how much your body can handle.

Famous Temple Bar in Dublin

6. Visit Northern Ireland

What I’m about to say may be controversial, but Norther Ireland is my favourite part of Ireland.

Eek. Please don’t hate me!

Northern Ireland is super unique and not like anywhere else in Ireland. It has a super interesting history.

Both in recent times and historically.

I mean the Titanic was constructed in Belfast!

I’m not suggesting you’ll love Northern Ireland as much as I do, but I do feel like a trip to Ireland isn’t quite complete without a trip to Norther Ireland.

It’s so different than anywhere else in Ireland and has a completely different vibe and atmosphere than the Republic of Ireland.

If you do go to Northern Ireland, take the time to learn about it’s history. That’ll help you figure out why it is so different than the rest of Ireland.

What I wish I knew before backpacking Europe alone

7. Ireland is Pretty Safe

If safety on your solo trip to Ireland is your concern, it doesn’t have to be.

All things considered, Ireland is very safe.

The only times I haven’t felt fully safe in Ireland is when I’m walking home in the dark. Not that there is any immediate need to be nervous or scared. It is more just the knowledge that I’m walking home alone and anything can happen.

But it likely won’t!

Outside of that, I’ve always felt very safe in Ireland everywhere I go. The locals are friendly, and they’ll help you out if you’re lost or in need of help.

Of course, anywhere is as safe as you make it.

You need to be smart and not do anything that would put you in harm’s way. Keep your head on a swivel, your valuables secured, and if your gut is telling you that something isn’t right, walk away.

Oh, and be safe crossing the street if you don’t live in a country where you drive on the left-hand side of the road.

I’ve seen too many tourists almost get hit by a car simply because they didn’t look properly before they crossed the street.

8. Don’t Skip Galway

I don’t know why Galway doesn’t get the love it deserves. I skipped Galway on my first solo trip to Ireland but visited it on my second.

A lot of blogs I read said that Galway wasn’t worth visiting and could be skipped, but I’m glad I visited the city.

It has such a fun and upbeat vibe. Not to mention it is one of the most beautiful cities in Ireland.

In my opinion.

Galway is super different to Dublin. It’s more laid back, has very different attractions, and is a more vibrant city.

Plus it’s right along the water, and there are some amazing natural attractions you can easily visit.

So, if you can, be sure to add Galway to your Ireland itinerary.

Or at least consider it!

Galway, Ireland

9. Be Internet Safe

One of the most important (and often overlooked) things you can do in preparing for your solo trip to Ireland is make sure you’re being internet safe.

As a traveller, you’re reliant on public wifi networks to access the internet.

This means you’re at a high risk of having your personal information and data stolen.

And trust me. You do not want to go through the headache of having your banking information stolen while you’re on holiday.

It’s a nightmare!

You may be thinking that you only use wifi networks that have a passcode, and you’re safe. I’m sorry to break it to you, but you’re not.

Anybody can get the passcode to a public wifi network and access your personal information if they want to.

The only way you can protect yourself and have your online information be secure is by installing a VPN on your devices.

A VPN basically puts a forcefield up around your devices that makes it impossible for a hacker to access your data even when using a public wifi network.

It makes using public wifi just as safe as using your home wifi where you’re the only person who knows the password.

Installing a VPN is a very simple thing you can do to protect yourself when travelling. It’s more important than you think!

My Favourite VPN

I’ve used a lot of different VPNs over my years of travel and honestly hated most of them. VPNs are notorious for slowing down your devices and making the internet painfully slow to use.

My frustrations with VPNs changed when I discovered NordVPN.

NordVPN is the fastest VPN on the market, which is why I love it so much and recommend it to all my friends and family.

You don’t notice you’re using a VPN because there isn’t a lag on your internet connection, which is super important when travelling.

You can protect up to 6 devices on a single subscription and easily protect all your devices.

The best part is that a two-year subscription to NordVPN costs less per month than a single Starbuck’s latte.

There is no excuse to not protect your online data!

My philosophy is that if you can afford to travel, you can afford to protect yourself with a VPN.

Conclusion

I hope you have a better idea now whether a solo trip to Ireland is right for you or not!

I’ve tried to give you an objective idea of what solo travel in Ireland looks like, so you can decide if it’s right for you or not.

Ireland is a great choice for solo travel if you have the budget. It has an amazing mixture of nature, history, culture, and architecture.

There really is something for everybody no matter what you’re interested in.

The major problem is that it can be expensive and is sometimes outside of people’s budgets.

Unforgettable Things to do in Brasov Alone

Brasov is one of my favourite cities in Romania. It has something for everyone and is super solo travel friendly. But, there are a few things to do in Brasov that you can’t miss on your trip!

These are the very best things Brasov has to offer and will make your solo trip to Brasov unforgettable.

If you’re nervous about visiting Brasov alone, don’t be!

All the best things to do in Brasov alone are easy to navigate yet stunning. Plus the city is quite small, so you don’t feel overwhelmed trying to navigate your way around the city and public transportation system.

But, without further ado, here are my top things to do in Brasov alone.

I’ve done all of these things on my solo trip to Brasov and loved them all!

Tips for travelling alone for the first time

1. Take a Free Walking Tour

On your first full day in Brasov, I highly recommend you join a free walking tour.

The free walking tour in Brasov is run by students, and it is one of the most informative free walking tours I’ve ever been on.

I joined the free walking tour in Brasov on my second to last day in the city, and I regretted not going on the tour earlier.

I learnt so much that changed my perspective of the city and made me appreciate buildings that I had walked by my entire stay in Brasov and not given a second glance to.

For being such a small city, there is a lot of history in Brasov, and there are a number of important events that took place in the city.

When you understand the history of Brasov, it makes the rest of your solo trip to Brasov that much more enjoyable and meaningful.

I don’t want to give you a schedule for the free walking tour because it’s bound to change.

Just Google “free walking tour in Brasov” or look for a flyer at the front desk if you’re staying at a hostel.

It is without a doubt one of the best and most important things to do alone in Brasov.

Oh!

And don’t be nervous about joining a walking tour as a solo traveller.

If you’re an introvert like me, just stick to the back of the pack. If you’re an extrovert, take the opportunity to meet your fellow travellers and maybe make plans with them to go on a day trip the next day.

2. Visit the Black Church

The Black Church is the centrepiece of Basov and no trip to Brasov is complete without touring it!

You’ll visit the outside of the church during the free walking tour (if you choose to join one), but you should take the time to go inside the church later on during your trip.

The murals inside the church date back to around 1477 and are really cool to see.

While the church isn’t as spectacular as some of the other churches you’ll find in Europe, it’s still worth a visit.

Especially after you learn a little bit about the church on your walking tour!

There is no fee to enter the church, and no photos are allowed.

Black Church Brasov

3. Take a Day Trip (or Two)

A lot of people use Brasov as a home base while they explore the small towns and attractions surrounding the city.

Brasov is in the perfect location, and there are tons of day trips to choose from.

One of the best things to do in Brasov alone is go on at least one day trip while you’re there.

All the day trips are super easy to navigate even if you’re new to travelling alone.

While this isn’t an extensive list, these were my favourite day trips from Brasov.

Bran Castle and Râșnov Fortress

You can easily knock both of these attractions out in a single day, and that’s exactly what most tourists do.

Bran Castle (otherwise known as Dracula’s Castle) is a short bus ride from Brasov but packed full of history.

It’s the castle Bram Stoker was inspired by when he wrote Dracula, and the castle has taken on that persona.

But, you’re not just touring a castle popular in science fiction. There is a surprising amount of history connected to the castle.

I honestly wasn’t expecting much from Bran Castle and expected it to be a bit silly, but I was wrong.

I spent hours wandering up and down the castle reading about the history and looking at the artifacts.

It’s 100% worth checking out and isn’t a tourist trap cashing in on a popular novel.

Râșnov Fortress is easy to visit on your way back to Brasov from Bran Castle.

It’s an outdoor fortress that is kept in mostly ruins.

There are oftentimes demonstrations and events you can take part in at the fortress, or you can just wander around and read the information about the history of the fortress.

I don’t think Râșnov is worth a visit on all it’s own, but if you’re going to Bran Castle, it is well worth a quick stop on the way back to Brasov.

Rasnov Fortress

Sighișoara

Sighișoara is a small town in the Transylvanian mountains. It’s a stunning town with lots of bright colours, amazing views, and cute streets.

But the town’s biggest claim to fame is having a building where Vlad the Impaler is said to be born.

You know. The man Stoker based Dracula off of.

You can even the house and even have a meal in it (the food is surprisingly good but a bit overpriced).

Even if you’re not into Dracula, Sighișoara is still worth visiting. It’s one of the most beautiful and colourful towns in Romania.

I loved wandering through the narrow streets, popping into stores, and taking in the atmosphere.

Granted, it’s very touristy, and you’ll likely run into a few tour groups along the way, but it’s still worth a visit!

Sibiu

Sibiu is probably my second favourite city in Transylvania behind Cluj-Napoca.

Sibiu is a charming town with one of the most amazing town squares in Romania. It’s like walking into a fairytale.

I love the bright colours, and Sibiu is much quieter than Sighișoara. Not nearly as many tourists visit Sibiu, but that’s starting to change.

Sibiu is starting to get the love it deserves and is becoming an ever popular day trip from Brasov.

Be sure to climb up the clock tower for the best view of the city! It’s well worth the price of admission.

4. Walk Up Tampa Mountain

Tampa Mountain is right in the heart of Brasov and walking up it is one of the best things to do in Brasov alone.

It isn’t a difficult walk, and most people can do the hike no matter their level of fitness.

Of course, you know your own body better than anybody. Don’t do anything you don’t think you can comfortably complete. Especially since you’re travelling alone.

Tampa Mountain gives you one of the best views of the centre of Brasov, the Black Church, and Council Square.

It’s free to walk up, there is a marked path, and you’re pretty much guaranteed to pass other tourists along the way since it’s such a popular tourist attraction.

If you can, try to hike Tampa Mountain to catch either sunrise or sunset.

You’ll enjoy the most spectacular views and have an experience you’ll never forget.

If you don’t feel comfortable walking up a mountain when it isn’t fully light out, then try to schedule your walk around mid-morning to try to miss some of the crowds.

No matter when you choose to hike Tampa Mountain, you won’t regret taking the time out of your day to do it.

It’s without a doubt a must-do activity while in Brasov.

What I wish I knew before backpacking Europe alone

5. People Watch in Council Square

I love people watching when I travel. It’s so fun, and you never know what interesting things you’ll see.

There is no better place in Brasov to people watch than in Council Square.

It’s the main square in Brasov and is the heart of the city for both tourists and locals. Find a little café, order a drink, relax, and soak in your surroundings.

Taking the time to relax and experience the city you’re in is super underrated for travellers, but it’s one of my favourite things to do.

Carve out an hour or two one afternoon just to people watch, and I know it’ll add to your experience of Brasov!

Council Square Brasov

6. Indulge in the Delicious Food

Romania might not be the first country to come to mind when you think of delicious food.

I certainly didn’t have any expectation for the food when I first visited the country. And let me tell you that I was blown away by the food!

The food everywhere in Romania is incredible, and Brasov is no exception.

You can stumble into pretty much any restaurant and have an incredible (and hearty) meal. For a very inexpensive price I may add!

The only thing to stay clear of is Western chains. Other than that, you’re in for a mouth-watering meal.

No matter what cuisine you’re in the mood for!

I walked up to a random pizza by the slice window the evening I arrived in Brasov and was blown away by how delicious a simple slice of pizza is.

But, if you really want to get a taste for Brasov and Romania, go to a traditional restaurant.

Wander a few blocks outside of the Council Square and the tourist areas and find the places locals eat at.

You won’t be disappointed!

Here is a list of some of the best restaurants in Brasov.

As a word of warning, I didn’t write the list, nor have I been to every restaurant on the list. I have, however, eaten at different restaurants recommended by this blog in other cities and enjoyed their recommendations.

Use it as a guide and not a bible.

I did eat at Sub Tâmpa and really enjoyed it, so that makes me trust their list a little bit more as well!

Black Church Brasov

The Importance of Being Internet Safe

One of the biggest things that people overlook when planning a trip is making sure they’re being internet safe.

You rely on public wifi when you travel, and that puts you at serious risk of having your online information and data stolen.

All it takes is for one person connected to that wifi network with bad intentions to steal your banking information or other private data.

And trust me. You do not want to be dealing with the headache of trying to sort out a banking crisis while you’re in a different country!

And I know what you’re thinking. But, no, if the public wifi network you’re using has a password, that doesn’t mean it’s safe to us. Anybody can access that password and access the network.

The only way to ensure you’re being safe when using the internet while travelling is to install a VPN on your devices.

A VPN essentially puts a forcefield around your devices that makes it impossible for a hacker to access your information.

It makes using a public wifi network just as safe as using your home wifi where you’re the only person who knows the password.

You may think it’ll never happen to you, but are you really willing to take that risk when it’s super easy to protect your online information?

My Favourite VPN

I’ve used a lot of different VPNs on my many years of travel. VPNs are notorious for slowing down your internet speed and making the internet incredibly slow and frustrating to use.

That’s why I used to just turn off my VPN and risk my online safety.

I can’t handle slow internet!

That all changed when I discovered NordVPN.

It’s the fastest VPN on the market, which is why I love it so much and recommend it to my fellow travel lovers.

In fact, it’s the only VPN subscription I’ve ever renewed, so you know it’s good!

In addition to be the fastest VPN out there, NordVPN is also super affordable. You can protect up to six devices on a single plan.

A two-year plan costs less per month than a single Starbuck’s latte, so you have no excuse not to protect your online safety.

My philosophy is that if you can afford to travel, you can afford to protect your online data with a VPN.

It’s a small price to pay for the piece of mind you get!

Conclusion

There you have it: the top things to do in Brasov alone. This is by no means a comprehensive list, but it’ll get you headed in the right direction!

I could have included visiting the Black and White Towers, but you visit them on the free walking tour.

If you don’t go on the free walking tour, make sure to visit them. They’re icons in Brasov and shouldn’t be missed.

Brasov is an extremely easy city to travel in. Even if this is your first solo trip, you shouldn’t have much issue navigating Brasov.

Plus it’s one of the best cities in Romania and shouldn’t be missed if you’re visiting the country!

Is Brighton Safe for Solo Female Travellers?!

Brighton is one of my favourite cities in the UK. It is so different than London and gives you a different taste of what the UK is like, but a lot of people wonder is Brighton safe?

The answer to that is a resounding and enthusiastic YES!

Brighton is extremely safe and is one of the cities in the UK I’ve felt the most comfortable and safe as a solo female traveller.

That doesn’t mean you don’t have to be careful in Brighton and that there is no chance of anything going wrong.

No city is perfect, and it is up to you as the traveller to ensure you behave in a way that makes you trip as safe as possible.

All things considered though, Brighton is safe, and you shouldn’t let any safety concern stop you from visiting this amazing city!

Essential tips for planning your first solo trip

Is Brighton Safe?

Just in case you skimmed the first part of this post, I just want to reiterate that Brighton is safe.

There aren’t any serious safety concerns you need to be aware of when planning your trip to Brighton.

Taking reasonable safety precautions will be enough!

Royal Pavilion Brighton

Brighton Safety Tips

While Brighton is safe, there are still a few safety tips you need to know before you visit the city.

These will ensure you’re safe and prepared in case something does go wrong.

Stay Safe when Swimming

The Brighton seafront is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city. If you go to Brighton, there is a 100% chance you’ll be spending a decent amount of your time near the water.

If you choose go into the water, be very careful.

The Brighton seafront is in the heart of the English Channel, and it is more difficult to swim in open waters than it is in the swimming pool.

Only swim in Brighton if you have the proper skills. On top of that, be sure to go swimming during the day when it is busy, and there are other people around.

You’re travelling alone, and you need to make sure there are other people around to see and hear you in case you start having trouble in the water.

If there is one thing that could make me change my mind on the question is Brighton safe or not, it is the swimming. You hear too many horror stories from around the world about people getting caught up in the water and drowning.

It is even scarier if you’re travelling alone and don’t have someone nearby to help you if that happens.

However, as long as you have the skills and swim during the day, you should be fine.

Better yet, stay dry and have a pint along the seafront and people watch. That is definitely more my style!

Click here and use code TRAVELSWITHERICA for 10% off my favourite Instagram presets!

Don’t Overindulge in Alcohol

Speaking of beer, I know it is tempting to enjoy a beer or two in Brighton, but you’ll be amazed at how easy it is to go from a casual beer to being tipsy.

The combination of being active, the heat, and how good a beer tastes along the Brighton seafront can be a dangerous combination.

Especially if you’re a solo female traveller.

I’ve made the mistake of overindulging when travelling before, and it can be extremely dangerous. One of the most dangerous things you can do while travelling whether you’re alone or with a group.

Just like swimming, a seemingly innocent activity like have a few drinks can make a safe city like Brighton turn into a dangerous city.

Plus, I think we all know the UK has a reputation for enjoying the pubs (which is by no means a bad thing!), so it is easier for you to get caught up in it than it may be when you’re at home.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with drinking, but just be sure to enjoy responsibly and remember you’re likely tired and slightly dehydrated, and that impacts your alcohol tolerance.

Brighton seafront

Be Internet Safe

Being internet safe is often overlooked when people talk about being safe when travelling.

You never think about protecting your devices and online data, but it is one of the most important safety precautions you can take no matter where you travel.

You rely on public wifi when you travel, and that puts your devices (and your personal online information) at risk of being stolen.

And, yes, even if the wifi network has a passcode, it is still a public network because anybody can get the password.

If you leave your devices unprotected, it’s possible that someone will hack into them and steal all your personal information.

Including your banking information.

That’s a nightmare you don’t want to have to deal with then you’re travelling.

Especially when you’re travelling alone and don’t have a companion to borrow money from while you sort out your banking troubles.

The only way you can protect your online information when using public wifi networks is by installing a VPN on your devices.

A VPN essentially puts up a forcefield around your devices that makes it impossible for a hacker to steal your private information.

It makes using a public wifi network just as safe as using your private wifi at home where you’re the only person who knows the password.

It’s a small but essential safety step to take before you travel.

My Favourite VPN

I’ve used a lot of different VPNs in my many years of travel. To be honest, most of them suck and aren’t worth the money.

They slow your internet down to a snail’s pace, and if you’re like me, you get frustrated with how slow your internet is, and you turn off the VPN leaving yourself exposed to having your online information stolen.

The only VPN I’ve ever liked is NordVPN.

I discovered it years ago and have no plans on ever switching providers ever again. In fact, it’s the only VPN I’ve ever renewed my subscription with, so it must be good!

The reason I love NordVPN (and recommend them to my fellow travel lovers) is because they’re the fastest VPN on the market.

It is so important to have fast internet when travelling, and having a VPN that doesn’t slow down your connection is an amazing feeling.

Plus, you can protect up to six devices with a single NordVPN subscription, so you can keep all your data safe for one low cost.

A two-year subscription to NordVPN costs less per month than a single Starbuck’s latte, so you have no excuse not to protect your online information and data.

My philosophy is that if you can afford to travel, you can afford to protect yourself with a VPN.

Stay Hydrated

Brighton is hot in the summer, and you’ll be doing a lot of outdoor activities. Even if you don’t swim, kayak, or rent a bike, you’ll be walking a lot.

That means you’re at serious risk of becoming dehydrated, which is no fun when you’re travelling!

Be sure to drink a ton of water when in Brighton.

Drink water before you leave, at every meal, and rehydrate when you get back to your hotel in the evening.

There is no such thing as too much water!

If you become dehydrated, you won’t be able to enjoy your solo trip to Brighton. You’ll be lethargic, potentially get heat stroke, and can even start feeling dizzy and lightheaded if it gets bad enough.

Dehydration is one of the things that can change the answer to the question is Brighton safe for solo travellers from a yes to a no.

The good thing though is that it is 100% within your control.

You can regulate how much water you drink and ensure you don’t get dehydrated. And if you ever start feeling thirsty, stop at a convenience store and buy a bottle of water.

I know plastic bottles are bad for the environment, but if it is a choice between a plastic water bottle and you becoming dehydrated, it is better to bite the bullet and buy a water bottle.

You can make up for it by picking up some of the trash along the beach later on!

Double Check Before Crossing the Street

For many people (me included) the cars in Brighton drive on the opposite side of the street than you’re used to.

I’ve seen way too many tourists almost be hit by cars in the UK because they looked the wrong way before crossing the street.

I don’t want that to happen to you!

Be sure to always look both ways before crossing the street and do a double check before stepping out into traffic.

Even if you’ve been to the UK before and are confident in your ability to look the right way before crossing the street, look both ways anyways.

All it takes is for you to slip back into your old habits, and you’re hit by a car you didn’t see.

15 epic things to do in London alone

Brighton Seafront

Be Safe Walking After Dark

Brighton is a safe city, but just like many other cities, you may want to be extra cautious when walking alone at dark.

Especially as a woman.

You never know what’ll happen, and while I feel safe 99% of the time in Brighton, I often find myself walking quicker and having my heart pumping faster when walking home alone in the dark.

There are areas in Brighton where you have to walk through narrow, winding street. Try to avoid those as much as possible at night.

Try to walk in well lit areas where there are a lot of people around.

This likely means walking along the seafront for as long as possible until you need to veer off to get to your accommodation.

There really isn’t much to worry about. The likelihood of anything happening to you is very low.

It is more for your peace of mind than anything else. It is always better to be safe than sorry when it comes to walking alone in the dark.

Oh, be sure to also have your purse of bag held tightly and preferably close to the front of your body.

You can’t see if someone is walking up behind you hoping to swipe your bag or pick pocket you. The better grip you have on your bag, the less likely it is that someone will try to grab it from you.

Conclusion

There you have it the answer to the question is Brighton safe.

I’m very happy to report that Brighton is extremely safe, and you can go and have an amazing holiday as a solo traveller without worrying about your safety.

I love Brighton and can’t wait to go back!

If you’re on the fence about whether or not to visit the city, I highly recommend you take the plunge and book the trip!

9 Tips to Know Before Taking a Solo Trip to Copenhagen

Copenhagen probably isn’t the first city that comes to mind when you start planning your solo trip but don’t count it out just yet! Taking a solo trip to Copenhagen is actually a better idea than you might think.

Copenhagen has a reputation for being expensive and a little far away from other parts of Europe.

That is true, but that doesn’t mean taking a solo trip to Copenhagen isn’t worth it.

Copenhagen is one of the few cities I’ve immediately fallen in love with. Even though it is a major city, it has a relaxed vibe and is surprisingly calming.

The only downside to taking a solo trip to Copenhagen is the cost.

There is no way of getting around the fact that Copenhagen is an expensive city. The price tag of simply getting a hotel or hostel may put Copenhagen out of budget for many solo travellers.

However, if you can afford to visit Copenhagen, you won’t regret it.

It’s an amazing city to say the least.

And if you decide to take a solo trip to Copenhagen, here are the top things you need to know before you go to ensure you have the most amazing trip!

What I wish I knew before backpacking Europe alone

1. Copenhagen is Very Walkable

If you’re anything like me, you love walking everywhere and anywhere you can when travelling.

You always stumble on the most unique neighbourhoods, sights, and people you would never experience if you hopped on public transportation.

Well I’ve got good news for you!

Copenhagen is an extremely walkable city. You can walk to pretty much any tourist attraction you want to visit in an hour or less.

Not only is Copenhagen extremely walkable, but it is also a nice city to walk around. All the different neighbourhoods are beautiful, and it is relaxing to walk around.

Plus being able to walk around the city rather than rely on public transportation can definitely help lower the cost of your solo trip to Copenhagen.

Copenhagen, Denmark

2. It’s Expensive

If you haven’t realized already, Copenhagen is an expensive city.

Even if you try to visit Copenhagen on a budget, it’ll still cost you more than a trip to most other places in Europe.

So, budget accordingly and just accept that it is going to be a more expensive trip.

That being said, there are ways you can make your trip to Copenhagen as affordable as possible.

  • Book a hostel or guest house rather than a hotel
  • Buy snacks and drinks at the grocery store rather than at a restaurant
  • Visit attractions on days when there is free entry (if applicable)
  • Walk around Copenhagen rather than take public transportation
  • Visit during off-peak times
  • Buy lunch at a grocery store and have a picnic
  • Book accommodation that offers complimentary breakfast
  • Use your student or senior discount

Being proactive and figuring out how to save a little money when you travel alone in Copenhagen will go a long way in making your wallet happy.

It doesn’t take much effort, but it can save you a lot of money in the long run.

That being said, don’t let the cost of Copenhagen deter you from visiting the city.

If you can afford to visit Copenhagen, it is 100% worth doing!

3. Take a Day Trip to Sweden

If you want to knock out seeing two countries in one trip, I’ve got good news for you!

You can visit a number of cities in Sweden on a day trip from Copenhagen. You can jump on the train and be in Sweden in less than two hours!

My two favourite cities in Sweden to visit from Copenhagen are Lund and Malmö.

Lund is a much smaller town and is one of the top university cities in Sweden. And if you don’t know, university towns are known for their amazing food!

Malmö is bigger than Lund and has more sights to see and experience. You have to visit the Malmö Castle if you visit the city.

It also has an amazing town square, and it is lovely to sit outside sipping on a beer on a warm day.

But, you can’t go wrong with either Lund or Malmö.

One important thing to note if you’re taking a day trip to Sweden from Copenhagen is you need to bring your passport.

It’s true that you Denmark and Sweden are part of the EU and have open borders. But, it has been my experience that Sweden likes to check that everybody entering Sweden has the right to be there.

Every time I’ve taken the train from Copenhagen to Sweden, the train has stopped at the first station in Sweden.

Swedish officials board the train, look at everybody’s documents, and then let the train continue.

So, in an abundance of caution, be sure you bring your passport and supporting documents showing you’re allowed to enter Sweden.

You don’t want to deal with the headache of not having your documents and trying to explain your situation.

In the best case scenario, you’ll be sent back to Denmark. In the worst, you’ll be detained for interview.

Malmo Train Station

4. English is Widely Spoken

One of the things people are nervous about when it comes to travelling alone in a foreign country is the language barrier.

That is one thing you don’t need to worry about on your solo trip to Copenhagen!

English is spoken by pretty much everybody, and you shouldn’t have an issue communicating with the locals.

Museums and major attractions have descriptions in both English and Danish, and nearly every restaurant offers their menu in English.

If you’re in need of help during your solo trip to Copenhagen, you don’t have to fret.

Basically anybody you ask for assistance will be able to communicate with you and help you out.

In the unlikely chance they can’t communicate with you, the next person you come across should be able to!

If a language barrier is what is holding you back from planning a solo trip to Copenhagen, book ahead. That won’t be an issue.

5. You Need to be Internet Safe

No matter where you’re travelling, it is important that you keep safety in mind when using the internet.

You’re reliant on public wifi networks, and that puts you at increased risk of having your online information and data stolen.

And, yes, your hotel wifi that has a passcode still counts as public wifi because anybody can get access to the password.

You’re probably thinking I’m being silly, and there is no risk to using public wifi networks.

That simply isn’t true. I know so many fellow travellers who weren’t internet safe and had their banking information stolen while they were on the road.

That’s a huge headache you don’t need when you’re on a solo trip to Copenhagen.

You don’t want to go through the hassel of having to cancel your bank cards and then try to figure out how you’re going to pay for the rest of your trip without access to your cards!

The only way you can safely use public wifi when travelling is if you install a VPN on your devices.

A VPN essentially puts a forcefield around your phone that makes it impossible for hackers to spy on and steal your personal information.

A VPN makes it using public wifi just as safe as using your home wifi network where you’re the only person who knows the password.

My Favourite VPN

I’ve used a lot of different VPN providers during my many years of travel and hated all of them.

VPNs are know to slow your devices down and make using the internet a very frustrating experience.

All my hatred and frustration disappeared when I discovered NordVPN.

It is the fastest VPN on the market, which is why I love it and recommend it to all my fellow travel lovers.

You don’t even notice you’re using a VPN because your internet speed isn’t slowed down!

Plus you can use your VPN to change your location and access Netflix and sports games from different countries than the one you’re visiting.

You have to check out South Korea’s Netflix. It is fantastic.

With NordVPN, you can protect up to six devices with one subscription, which makes it even more affordable than you think.

A two-year NordVPN subscription costs less than the price of a single Starbuck’s latte per month.

Yeah. It is that affordable!

You really have no excuse not to protect your online data and privacy with a VPN.

My philosophy is that if you can afford to travel, you can afford to protect your online data with a VPN.

It is a small price to pay to ensure all your online information is safe and secure.

6. Consider Having a Picnic in Assistens Cemetery

This definitely sounds like an extremely odd tip to find in an article about travelling alone in Copenhagen but hear me out!

Assistens Cemetery is one of the most beautiful cemeteries in the world.

It is full of greenery, benches, and walking paths. If it weren’t for the headstones, you wouldn’t know you were in a cemetery.

Locals hang out in Assistens Cemetery all the time, and it is one of the most calming and relaxing places in all of Copenhagen.

Having a picnic in Assistens Cemetery is also a great way to save a little money on your trip!

Pick up a salad or sandwich at a grocery store and bring it to the cemetery on a nice day.

Find a bench and enjoy your meal in one of the most beautiful places in the city. You should also do some people watching while you’re there!

You’ll see people hanging out with friends, running, biking, and enjoying a meal just like you.

While you’re there, be sure to stop by and visit the grave of Hans Christian Andersen!

7. Don’t Skip Tivoli

Nobody should leave Copenhagen without visiting Tivoli gardens. It is a theme park in the heart of Copenhagen and is a must-do for anybody visiting the city.

In fact, it was one of the theme parks Walt Disney visited when looking for inspiration for Disneyland, and you can see a lot of similarities between some of the rides at Tivoli and Disneyland.

You might be nervous about visiting a theme park alone, but you shouldn’t be!

I love visiting theme parks alone and actually find it to be more enjoyable than visiting theme parks with friends and family a lot of the time.

Nobody will notice you’re there alone, and there aren’t super long wait times like at other theme parks, so you won’t be standing alone in line for very long.

Tivoli is so much fun, and being nervous about visiting it alone shouldn’t stop you.

It has incredible thrill rides, kiddie rides, and rollercoasters.

Just be sure to eat before you visit Tivoli since the food is expensive and not the best.

You’ll also want to purchase an unlimited ticket option. You have to pay per ride, and it adds up quickly. That’s avoided when you purchase the unlimited ticket option.

You can go on as many rides as you want to for one price and not have to worry about running out of ticket.

You need to ride at least four rides to make the unlimited ticket price worth your while, but if you’re going to Tivoli, you’re definitely going to want to ride more than four rides!

Overcome your fear of travelling alone

Tivoli Gardens, Copenhagen

8. Copenhagen is Safe Even at Night

One of the best parts about Copenhagen is that it is extremely safe.

There are a lot of places I feel a bit nervous walking around alone at night, and Copenhagen isn’t one of them.

It is one of the safest cities in the world, and you really feel how safe it is when you’re there.

You don’t feel the urge to clutch your purse a bit tighter or constantly check behind you to make sure nobody is following you.

The fact that Copenhagen is so safe is one of the many reasons it is ideal for solo female travellers. Especially people new to travelling alone.

Of course, you still need to take basic safety precautions in Copenhagen like you do anywhere in the world.

But, you don’t have to worry about as much petty crime (or serious crime) as you do in other places around the world.

Keep your valuables safe in your bag, try to blend in with the locals, and don’t draw too much attention to yourself. Follow those rules, and you’ll be more than safe in Copenhagen!

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9. Research Food Choices Ahead of Time

One of the only complaints I have about Copenhagen is the food. It is expensive, and it wasn’t my favourite.

It was also difficult to find vegetarian/vegan food throughout the city as well.

That doesn’t mean it isn’t possible though!

However, it is essential that you research food options before you head out for a day of exploring.

Know what neighbourhood you’ll be in around lunch and diner time and find a few choices in that area you might want to check out.

You’ll know the menu suits your dietary restrictions and know whether or not it is in your price range before you get a table and pull out the menu.

The other reason you should research food options in advance is so you know there will be places to eat wherever you plan to be during meal time.

I had an issue where I was exploring a more residential area and started to get really hungry. I didn’t have my Solis at the time and couldn’t access the internet.

I wandered around for quite a while until I stumbled on a restaurant. It was the first one I’d come across, and I went in to eat without a second thought because I was starving.

Well, the food wasn’t very good, was really expensive, and I had to modify an item because there weren’t any vegetarian options on the menu.

I leave the restaurant, turn the corner, and find two more restaurants that looked better than the one I ate at.

If I had done any research beforehand, I would have known to keep walking for two more minutes to find a better place to eat.

Lesson learned!

Tips for eating alone

Copenhagen, Denmark

Conclusion

I hope this article showed you that taking a solo trip to Copenhagen is super easy. It is one of the easiest cities to travel around and is very safe.

Of course, the downside is that it is an expensive city, but there are ways around that- especially if you buy food at a grocery store than than a restaurant.

If you’ve been thinking of taking a solo trip to Copenhagen, I hope this article was a sign that you should book the trip.

You won’t regret it!

Is Taipei Safe for Solo Female Travellers?!

Taiwan isn’t a very well known Asian country and many people wonder is Taipei safe for solo female travellers?

Especially with the small island being in the news more and more often nowadays as China makes statements about wanting to reclaim Taiwan.

I didn’t know anything about Taiwan and it’s capital Taipei when I booked my first trip there in 2019. It was the cheapest flight I could find and decided to book it.

I’m so happy I did because it was a fabulous trip!

So, the answer to the question is Taipei safe is yes, yes, yes! Taipei is extremely safe for solo travellers.

It is one of the safest countries in Asia, and you don’t have to worry about anything going wrong on your trip (for the most part)!

I immediately felt safe, comfortable, and confident when I landed in Taipei.

I spent three weeks travelling around Taiwan and never once did I feel unsafe.

There are, of course, a number of things you need to do to make sure your solo trip to Taipei is safe.

But, they aren’t anything wild and are things you should do whenever you go on any trip.

Taipei is so safe and easy to travel that I even recommend it for people who are new to solo travel!

So, if you’re wondering is Taipei safe, the answer is yes. Book that trip and have an amazing time!

Solo travel in Taiwan

Is Taipei Safe?

Just in case you skimmed over the intro (totally don’t blame you!), I wanted to dedicate this little section to the question is Taipei safe.

Yes. Taipei is a very safe city for solo female travellers. You won’t run into any issues in Taipei and will feel safe everywhere you go.

Taiwanese people are some of the kindest people in the world. They’ll go out of their way to make sure you’re safe and feel comfortable in their country.

If safety was your only concern, you can go ahead and book that solo trip to Taipei!

National Concert Hall Taipei, Taiwan

Taipei Safety Tips

As mentioned, there are a few things you can do as a solo traveller to be a little bit extra safe in Taipei.

Since Taipei is a very safe city, there aren’t any extra precautions you need to take to be safe.

These are general guidelines you should follow to be safe not only in Taipei but anywhere you travel.

A few are specific to Taipei, but they can be extrapolated and applied to anywhere you travel.

Watch Out for Scooters

Don’t laugh. Scooters are actually a bit of an issue in Taipei (and Taiwan).

If there was one thing that would make me question is Taipei safe, it would be the scooters.

They are everywhere. You’ll pass by hundreds of them a day and will never be able to avoid them.

They’re even in pedestrian only areas where you think you’re safe from scooters. You’re not. You never are.

Basically everyone in Taipei has a scooter and uses it to get around. That being said, not everybody that has a scooter should.

People drive them like wild people, and I saw at least four people fall off or crash their scooter the first time I was in Taiwan.

One lady was driving her scooter down a pretty wide alley where it was only me walking, a street food vendor, and her. She was scooting around and somehow managed to fall off and was flat on the ground in no time.

It is your responsibility as a pedestrian to stay out of the way of the scooters.

People driving the scooters will try their very best to avoid pedestrians, but they’re driving a big machine.

If you’re in front of them and start walking erratically, swerving all over the place, that’s on you. They can only turn and navigate their scooter by the laws of their scooter. They can turn on a dime the sam way you can.

Without a doubt, scooters are the biggest safety hazard in Taipei, which means it is a very safe city.

All you have to do is keep an eye out for the scooters and make sure you’re walking safely. Keep your eyes and ears peeled.

If you notice a scooter behind you, walk as close to the curb or side of the street as you can to give them room to pass.

Taipei, Taiwan

Avoid Sketchy Street Food

Taipei is a foodie’s dream city. It has some of the most incredible food I’ve ever eaten, and I find myself dreaming of going back to Taipei not necessarily for the sights but for the food.

There are street vendors and night markets everywhere you turn.

You’re never short of options when it comes to quick, cheap, and delicious street food.

Just like anywhere else in the world, you want to be smart when choosing what street food stalls to eat at.

Sometimes food sits around in the heat for a long time before you buy it. That’s a recipe for a stomach ache.

Luckily, street food is a way of life in Taipei, and you rarely have to worry about street food sitting around in the heat for too long.

If you’re at a popular night market, that won’t be an issue. Most stalls are so busy they have to continually make new food.

You might even be stuck waiting in line for a while at the most popular stall!

The only time you really need to pay attention to how fresh the food stall food is is when you’re out and about walking in a random, small alley and decide you’re hungry.

You can find street food pretty much anywhere you go.

But do you really want to eat it?

If you’re not sure whether or not something is fresh and good to eat, just follow the locals and eat what they eat.

They live in Taipei and know what and where the best food is. You can’t go wrong tagging along and silently taking their recommendation.

However, as I stated earlier, this isn’t really an issue. Most street food in Taipei is super fresh and safe to eat!

What to wear in Taiwan as a woman

Taiwan Night Market

Stay Hydrated

The thing I was most unprepared for the first time I visited Taipei was the heat.

Holy moly was it ever hot and humid in Taiwan!

If there is one thing that would make wonder is Taipei safe, it is the weather.

A lot of people aren’t used to the weather in Taipei and don’t protect themselves against it.

It is extremely important that you stay hydrated when you’re in Taipei.

Drink twice as much as you normally do and make sure you’re drinking a lot during the day.

You can’t drink the water straight out of the tap in Taipei, so you’ll need a plan on how you’ll stay hydrated.

You can rely on purchasing single-use plastic bottles or you can bring your own water bottle and refill it.

There are many water fountains around Taipei where you can refill your reusable water bottle.

Most tourist attractions have water bottle filling stations and many convenience stores allow you to fill up your water bottle as well.

Some may ask you to make a small purchase but many don’t.

The bottom line is that it is super easy to get dehydrated in Taipei and feel unwell from it.

The heat and humidity will kick you in the butt if you’re not hydrated.

You’ll also be walking around a lot so take that into account as well when figuring out how much water you need to drink.

National Theater of Taiwan

Know Local Scams

All things considered, that aren’t many tourist scams in Taipei you need to be aware of!

That really speaks to how safe Taipei is for tourists!

The only major tourist scam I’m aware of is the typical taxi scam. The driver “forgets” to turn on the meter and then charges you an extreme amount of money.

It is super simple to avoid. Just demand that your taxi driver turn on the meter. If they don’t, tell them you’re getting out of the car.

Other minor tourist scams include watering down fresh fruit juice, overcharging tourists, and not giving the proper amount of change back.

Just be on guard and aware of your surroundings.

Nothing bad should happen to you in Taipei. Especially since you’re a savvy tourist who is prepared!

All things considered, Taipei is one of the safest places I’ve been.

I never worried about being scammed or had any distrust in a local’s intentions.

Taipei 101

Be Internet Safe

Everybody talks about physical safety when travelling, but we need to talk about your online safety as well.

When you travel, you rely on public wifi networks.

That puts you a high risk of having your online information stolen. All it takes is one person with bad intentions using the same wifi network as you, and poof your banking information has been compromised.

You do not want to go through the headache of canceling debit and credit cards while you’re abroad.

And, yes, public wifi networks at places like your hotel that have a password as still public wifi networks because anybody can access them.

The only way you can keep your online data safe and secure while using a public wifi network is by installing a VPN on all of your devices.

A VPN basically puts a forcefield around your devices that makes it impossible for a hacker to access your online data.

It makes using a public wifi network just as safe as using your home wifi where you’re the only person who knows the password.

Installing a VPN on your devices is an extremely easy thing to do, and you’ll be kicking yourself if you don’t do it if something goes wrong when you’re travelling.

A tourist’s guide to wifi in Taipei

My Favourite VPN

I’ve used a lot of different VPNs over my years of travel.

To be honest, I hated most of them. VPNs are known to slow down your phone, and that’s the last thing you want when you’re travelling.

A slow VPN gets very frustrating very quickly. I ended up not using my VPN and putting my online data at risk because I was so fed up with how slow it was to use the internet with my VPN turned on.

That all changed when I discovered NordVPN.

It is the fastest VPN on the market, which is why I recommend it to my fellow travel lovers.

I’ve been using my NordVPN for years and have never had an issue with it slowing down my devices.

It is the only VPN I’ve used for more than a year, and I don’t ever plan on switching to a different VPN provider.

The best part?

You can install a single NordVPN subscription on up to six devices, so you can protect all your devices for one super low price.

The cost of a two-year NordVPN subscription is less per month than the cost of a single latte.

If your online data and safety isn’t worth the same to you as a single latte, you may need to reconsider what your priorities are.

My philosophy is that if you can afford to travel, you can afford to protect yourself with a VPN.

There is simply no excuse not to!

Conclusion

There you have it! The answer to the question is Taipei safe for solo female travellers?

I’m very happy to tell you that Taipei is extremely safe for solo travellers. You won’t run into any safety issues while exploring the country.

The only thing that may cause you trouble on your trip to Taipei is self-inflicted dehydration.

But, now you’re aware of it and won’t make that mistake!

All things considered, Taipei is one of the safest cities for solo female travellers in Asia. There isn’t really any trouble you can get into as long as you use common sense.

If you’re looking to take your first solo trip to Asia, there is hardly a better choice than Taipei!

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Is Marrakech Safe for Solo Female Travellers?

Marrakech is a very popular tourist destination, but a lot of solo travellers are put off from visiting because they wonder is Marrakech safe or not.

I totally understand the question and potential hesitation.

Especially if you’re new to solo travelling!

My parents had the same concerns and were trying to convince me not to visit Morocco, but I’m glad I did!

So, to answer your question is Marrakech safe for solo female travellers, my answers is yes! But there are some very important things you need to know before you arrive in Marrakech to ensure you’re safe.

If you’re used to travelling around in Europe, and that is your only solo travel experience, visiting Marrakech will be a bit of a shock.

That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t go though!

I thoroughly believe that exploring places that are very unlike your own is important. It can be a bit intimidating, but that’s how you grow as a person and traveller.

By the end of this article, you’ll know how to safely navigate Marrakech and have an amazing solo trip to Morocco!

Benefits of travelling alone

Is Marrakech Safe?

Just in case you skimmed the intro (I don’t blame you), I want to reiterate that Marrakech is safe for solo female travellers.

It is no more dangerous than most other popular solo travel destinations.

However, the culture is different in Marrakech, and there are some additional things you need to know to feel safe in the city.

These are small things that will help you navigate the new city with confidence and avoid some of the common scams in Morocco.

The answer to the question is Marrakech safe may be subjective, but, in general, I think it is.

Anywhere is as safe as you make it. If you go around breaking Moroccan laws and acting recklessly, then it isn’t going to be safe.

If you travel in a safe way and do your best to adhere to local culture, pretty much anywhere you travel is safe- including Morocco!

Marrakech is a vibrant city, and I don’t want you to miss out on experiencing it just because someone in your life is telling you it isn’t safe.

They’ve probably never been there and are just fear mongering.

Listen to the people who have been there, take their tips to heart, and decide for yourself whether you’re confident enough in your solo travel skills to explore a new culture and region.

Marrakech, Morocco

Marrakech Safety Tips

As I said, there are a few things you need to keep in mind in order to be as safe in Marrakech as possible.

Some of these may seem like common sense, but they are even more important to pay attention to in Marrakech than other parts of the world.

As long as you follow these tips, you’ll be safe and having the time of your life in Marrakech.

Never Look Lost

One of my biggest tips I can give you is never, ever, ever look lost when in Marrakech.

If you have no idea where you are, wait to pull out your map until you’re in a store, bathroom, or restaurant.

Morocco is a tipping culture. If someone sees you looking lost or unsure, they will come up and “help” you even if you don’t ask or need it.

And once they’re done helping you, they expect a tip and won’t leave until you give them one.

If you are a solo female traveller in Marrakech and even give off the slightest hint of being lost, it won’t be long until there are at least two or three people around you trying to help you out.

There isn’t anything wrong with this, and the people helping you aren’t unsafe, but it can still be a bit annoying and unwanted.

Especially if you have an idea of where you want to go and was just checking your route.

I spent some time in Essaouira and then took a bus back to Marrakech and stayed in the same hotel in Marrakech as I had previously.

I knew the way and didn’t show any doubt in where I was going, but two men walked with me to “show” me the way and then wouldn’t leave until I tipped them for their help when we got to the hotel.

Again, nothing wrong with a tipping society, but it can make a lot of solo female travellers feel uncomfortable.

So, if you want to wander around and try to be as invisible as possible (I do!), then it is in your best interest to walk with confidence and try not to look too lost or unsure of yourself.

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Avoid Sketchy Street Food

Marrakech is home to some of the most delicious food I’ve ever eaten.

I’m salivating right now just thinking of it.

However, you need to be a bit cautious when choosing what street food to indulge in.

Sometimes the food sits in carts on the street without proper cooling tools used. And Marrakech is hot all year around, so it doesn’t take long for a food to get a little bit too much of the heat.

There are also sometimes issues with bugs swarming around the food.

I’m not saying don’t indulge in the street food.

You should 100% take advantage of the yummy food and try it out. All I’m saying is make your choices wisely.

If you’re going to eat street food, make sure it is from somewhere the locals seem to eat, and, preferably, order hot food that is cooked right in front of you.

That way you know it is fresh!

You don’t want to accidentally eat something that will upset your stomach and have to miss out on some of your time exploring Marrakech because you’re sick.

Marrakech, Morocco

Learn to Say No Forcefully

This tip goes back to the first tip on this list.

Morocco (and especially Marrakech) is built on a tipping culture. Locals are looking out for tourists they can help guide around for a tip.

As a solo female traveller, you’ll likely garner a lot of attention.

If you’re like me and just want to wander around alone, you’ll have to learn how to say no forcefully to get the point across that you don’t want any help.

This doesn’t always work, but it will work in a lot of situations.

I know it feels weird (it certainly did to me as a soft-spoken introvert), but it is what it is, and you have to learn how to do it.

Another extremely important skill you need to learn is haggling.

If you’re purchasing anything in the souk or taking a taxi somewhere, haggle, haggle, haggle.

This is still a challenge for me to this day, but it it is an important skill to try to learn. People will try to rip you off and/or not listen to you, and you need to be forceful with your words and haggle to a reasonable price.

Of course, you want to pay a fair price because this is how people make a living, but most of the time the starting price is ridiculously too high. Even for me as someone who is more than willing to overpay to avoid as much haggling as possible.

I know this tip doesn’t really answer the question is Marrakech safe for solo female travellers, but standing your ground is an important part of making Marrakech the safest place for you.

Of course, you could be the exact opposite of me and enjoy the help from the locals.

But, you still need to know how to haggle and say no forcefully if the situation calls for it.

Be Cautious in the Souks

I don’t know why, but it seems like the rules of society go out the window when you enter the Marrakech souk.

Things that would never be considered appropriate are fair game.

As a solo female traveller, you need to be prepared for the tight, winding lanes of the souks and for more direct and forward advances.

The souk was the only place in Marrakech where I felt a little uncomfortable.

Men would cat call me at every turn, they would grab me by the wrist, and a few times I was even touched in my lower back.

It definitely took me by surprise since it was completely different to what I had experienced in the rest of Marrakech.

The first time I visited the souk was the only time I wondered is Marrakech safe?

As soon as I realized this was something that may or may not happen when I wandered through the souk, I was able to prepare for it.

I gave myself a little pep talk before I entered the souk, walked as confidentially as I could, and took a few calming breathes.

It is my philosophy not to comment or make a fuss when things like that happen no matter where in the world I am.

I may not enjoy it, but I’m a visitor in their country. I can’t impose my beliefs on them.

I just walk by, ignore them, and remember what stall they’re at, so I know not to purchase something from them in the future.

All in all, most people in the souks are incredibly kind, helpful, and just want to make a sale (get your haggling skills ready).

But, just like anything, there are a few exceptions.

I don’t want to taint your opinion of Marrakech in any way because it is a fabulous city.

I went back and forth whether or not I should include this point, but I finally decided that I wish it was something I was more prepared for when I visited the souk for the first time.

Marrakech, Morocco

Dress Appropriately

I personally think it is important to dress according to the standards of the country you’re visiting.

I know some people feel that they should be able to dress however they want, but I think it is important to be respectful of local customs.

In Marrakech, that means dressing more on the conservative side.

You by no means have to wear a head covering, but you should wear something that covers you shoulders, knees, and definitely not show cleavage or your stomach.

It is not only respectful to the locals, but it also makes Marrakech a bit more safe.

Again, not that Marrakech isn’t safe!

Dressing conservatively will help you blend in and avoid unwanted attention.

It is a simple thing you can do to respect the locals and make your visit to Marrakech as safe as possible.

Overcome your fear of solo travel

Be Internet Safe

No matter where you travel, you rely on public wifi networks. Marrakech is no exception.

Physical safety is always talked about, but not enough people talk about the need to be internet safe.

Using a public wifi network puts you at risk of having your personal online data stolen. This is a headache at the best of times but even worse when you’re travelling.

You do not want to have to deal with trying to cancel debit and credit cards because your information was stolen because you were being careless online.

And, yes, even if wifi you’re using has a passcode, it is still a public wifi network because basically anybody can get the passcode.

The only way you can make sure you’re being safe when using a public wifi network is by installing a VPN on your devices.

A VPN basically puts an invisible forcefield around your phone that makes it impossible for a hacker to access your private information and data.

A VPN makes using public wifi just as safe as using your home wifi where you’re the only person who knows the passcode.

My Favourite VPN

I’ve used a lot of different VPNs over my many years of travel. To be honest, most of them suck!

VPNs are known to slow down your internet, and it can be extremely painful using a VPN when you’re trying to quickly Google or stream something.

That all changed when I discovered NordVPN.

It is the fastest VPN on the market, and you barely notice a reduction in your internet speed when you use it.

That’s why I love it and recommend it to all my fellow travel lovers!

I’ve been using NordVPN for years and don’t plan on ever changing providers, which is saying a lot!

They’re the first VPN I’ve ever used past one year and have renewed my subscription to.

You can install your NordVPN on up to 6 devices, so you can protect your online data everywhere for one low price.

A two-year subscription to NordVPN costs less than the price of a latte per month. You don’t have an excuse to not protect your online data when you travel!

My philosophy is that if you can afford to travel, you can afford to install a VPN on your devices and protect your online information.

It is a small price to pay to sleep easy knowing nobody can steal your private information and data.

Learn Common Scams

No matter where you go, it is important to be aware of the local scams in the area.

Knowing about local scams before you arrive in a city is essential. It prevents you from falling victim to a scam, losing money, and putting yourself at risk.

I’ve fallen victim to many scams around the world (although none in Morocco), and I don’t want you to go through the same horrible feeling I have.

The most common scams in Marrakech to look out for include:

  • People “leading” you to the medina but take you the wrong way
  • Offering something for free and then insisting you pay for it
  • The rug scam (they offer you free tea to enter their store and then get mad if you don’t purchase a rug that costs thousands of dollars)
  • Fake goods

Be aware of these scams (and more) and be prepared to say no with force if you’re approached by someone you think is trying to scam you.

Avoid Drinking Alcohol in Public

Drinking in Morocco is legal, but tourists are the only people allowed to drink in public.

While you totally can drink in public legally, I recommend solo female travellers either refrain totally from drinking or only drink in private at their hotel.

A woman drinking alone in public will likely draw more attention than a woman just eating alone in public.

My philosophy when travelling alone is to blend in as much as possible and act as much like a local as I can.

And in Marrakech that includes not drinking in public even though it can be freaking hot and a cold beer would taste incredible.

This is totally your call because drinking is legal.

It all comes down to what makes you feel safest in Marrakech and gives you the most confidence.

For me, I’ll stick to water.

Marrakech, Morocco

Be Prepared for Some Culture Shock

Marrakech is the first place I experienced culture shock. I had mostly travelled around Europe before my trip to Morocco and was used to North America and Europe.

Marrakech was the first city I visited where things were really different from my own experiences, and it took a little while to get used to it.

I know this technically isn’t a Marrakech safety tip, but I still think it is important to know before you arrive in Morocco.

Marrakech is a loud and busy city. There are always things going around, and you can get a bit overwhelmed at first.

I suggest you plan an extra day or two in Marrakech to help you get used to Morocco if you’ve never visited a country like it before.

This gives you the chance to move slowly and go back to your hotel if you start feeling overwhelmed.

One of my mom’s friend’s daughters went to Marrakech alone and was so overwhelmed that she booked a flight out the next day.

So, if you want to be able to experience Marrakech and have time to get over the culture shock, take the first day or two slow.

It may even be in your best interest to go on a guided walking tour the first day, so you can get your bearings and feel more confident walking around alone the rest of your trip.

Be Careful Crossing the Street

The only thing that really makes you question whether Marrakech is safe or not is trying to navigate crossing the busy roads.

It isn’t an issue once you get a feel for what is going on.

And is certainly nothing compared to trying to cross a busy street in China!

My best tip for you is to stand back and watch how the locals cross the street for a few minutes before trying to cross the street yourself.

You’ll get an understanding of what the unwritten rules are and how to safely cross the street when there are scooters and cars buzzing around.

Better yet, you can wait until a local crosses the street and follow closely behind them.

You can mimic how they cross the street and ensure you get to the other side safely.

The odds of you getting hit while crossing the street (even if you do it poorly) are very low, but you don’t want the stress of causing a traffic jam and having people honking and yelling at you!

Tips for travelling alone for the first time

Marrakech, Morocco

Conclusion

There you have it! The answer to the question is Marrakech safe for solo female travellers.

There is a lot of mystery and misconceptions about Morocco and Marrakech. Some people assume that since it is a majority Muslim country, it isn’t safe for solo female travellers.

That simply isn’t true.

Marrakech is very safe, and you shouldn’t run into any issues when you visit the city.

The important thing is that you behave in a way that makes your visit to Marrakech safe.

Don’t do anything illegal or draw too much attention to yourself. If you dress conservatively, don’t wander around alone at night, and stand your ground, you’ll be fine.

I don’t want the thought of Marrakech not being safe to prevent you from exploring the beautiful city.

It may not be the best place for your first solo trip if you’re from North America, but once you have a little solo travel under your belt, you shouldn’t have any trouble exploring Marrakech alone.

Solo Travel in Croatia: 9 Things to Know Before You Go

Croatia is quickly becoming one of the most popular tourist destinations in Europe. Tourists are flocking to Croatia, but there are a few things you need to know about solo travel in Croatia before your trip.

Before we get too deep into this post, I figure I should let you know that Croatia is an amazing place to take a solo trip.

It is very welcoming to solo travellers and easy to navigate.

Even if you’re a first time solo travellers, you can confidentially book a solo trip to Croatia and know everything will go smoothly.

If you’re planning a solo backpacking trip to Europe and visiting multiple countries, Croatia is the prefect addition.

It is very different from the standard places like London and Paris that people book for their European vacations.

You get a different taste of Europe while still being able to easily travel around.

Plus Croatia is less expensive than Western Europe, so your wallet will enjoy the break as well!

While Croatia is a great place to add to your itinerary, there are still some things you need to know about solo travel in Croatia before you trip.

Lucky for you, I’m sharing everything I learned during my solo trip to Croatia, so you don’t make the same mistakes I did!

Tips for planning your first solo trip

1. Don’t Skip Zagreb

When I was planning my first solo trip to Croatia, every blog I read told me to skip Zagreb because it wasn’t anything special.

Seriously! Every single blog about where to go in Croatia told me to skip Zagreb!

The only thing people said was worth visiting near Zagreb was Plitvice Lakes. So, visit the lakes and then get out of town was the message.

Thankfully, I didn’t listen to what I read on the internet and booked four days in Zagreb.

There were four of the best days I had in Croatia!

There is so much to do in Zagreb outside visiting Plitvice Lakes, and it is well worth taking the time to explore what the capital of Croatia has to offer.

My personal favourite attraction in Zagreb is the Museum of Broken Relationships.

I know it sounds odd, but it is actually a very moving museum and one of only three museums I’ve ever shed a tear in.

Zagreb is just so different from the other popular cities in Croatia, and no trip to Croatia is complete without visiting it in my opinion.

Most underrated cities in Europe

Zagreb, Croatia

2. Explore More than Just the Old Towns

When you imagine Croatia, you probably imagine wandering through all the beautiful old towns the country has to offer.

The old towns are definitely some of the best parts of Croatia, but there are countless other things to do in Croatia that you should take the time to explore.

One of the best tips for solo travel in Croatia I can give you is to get outside the old towns and see what modern Croatia has to offer.

You won’t be disappointed, and you never know what you’ll stumble on.

There are museums, gardens, palaces, food markets, shopping centres, and everything else you could dream of visiting as a tourist.

Most people who visit Croatia focus on the old towns and ignore the rest of Croatia.

That is a huge mistake I don’t want you to make!

You miss out on the majority of the country and the true culture when you focus all your attention on the old towns and none of it on everything else.

Book an extra day or two in every city and get off the beaten track and explore the city you’re in.

3. Krka National Park > Plitvice Lakes

This may cause a little controversy, but if you only have time to visit one waterfall, I think it should be Krka National Park.

Excuse me while I duck in case you’re flinging something at me in anger after reading that.

In my opinion, Krka National Park is significantly underrated. Not many tourists visit it. You get more space to explore and enjoy the natural beauty without being crammed next to a bunch of tourists.

Plus, I think the falls at Krka National Park are simply nicer than the ones at Plitvice Lakes.

Of course, if you have time, you should visit both, but a lot of people don’t have time to visit both.

Krka National Park is a short bus ride away from Split, which is one of the best cities in Croatia. You can easily visit it as a day trip without any inconvenience.

I know it is a controversial thing to say in a post about solo travel in Croatia, but I said what I said, and I stand by it.

Don’t sleep on Krka National Park.

It is probably my favourite thing to do in Croatia, and you won’t regret visiting it on your solo trip to Croatia!

Krka National Park
Krka National Park

4. It is More Expensive than You Think

Croatia isn’t as expensive as other countries in Europe like Iceland, Denmark, and the UK, but it isn’t as cheap as you think it is either.

Without a doubt the thing that surprised me the most about solo travel in Croatia is that it was more expensive than I thought.

I had spent the last month in the Balkans in places like Bulgaria, Albania, and Macedonia, so I was used to very inexpensive travel.

It was a bit of a shock to arrive in Croatia and start having to pay more than I was used to.

Not that Croatia is terribly expensive, but it isn’t super budget friendly. With the rise of it’s popularity, it will likely only get more and more expensive as time goes on.

To give you an idea, visiting Croatia costs about the same as visiting Czechia, a little less than visiting Portugal, and 25% more than visiting Poland.

Group tours and popular tourist attractions are going to cost more because the country is becoming more popular.

It is still a good option for people backpacking Europe on a budget though.

You get to experience a new side of Europe, and it is a very easy travel experience. And if you’re coming from Western Europe, it will definitely feel like a budget experience!

I just wanted to give you a realistic budget for solo travel in Croatia. There is nothing worse than being misled by bloggers about how much a certain destination costs and then running out of money partway through your trip or not being able to experience everything you want to.

I’ve been there are number of times before and don’t want you to go through the same thing. Because it really sucks!

Tips for travelling alone for the first time

5. Don’t Rush Around the Country

One of the biggest mistakes travellers make is rushing through a trip and running from place to place without seeing anything.

I’m looking at you bus trips through Europe where you see 10 countries in 12 days.

This solo travel in Croatia tip goes back to the point I was making when I said visit more than just the old towns.

While it is tempting to only go to Dubrovnik or take an island hopping tour, that is so much more to Croatia that is worth exploring.

Spend a little longer in Croatia, get off the beaten track, and see what else the country has to offer than just Game of Thrones filming locations and party islands.

Explore the history, the museums, the food, the modern side of the country.

If you have a week to spend in Croatia, only visit two cities rather than three cities and go on an island tour.

Travel isn’t about rushing around, getting a photo everywhere you go, and bragging about how many places you’ve been.

Travel should be about experiencing something new, learning, and growing as a person.

Taking the time to really explore Croatia is especially important for solo travellers. If you’re introverted and anxious like me, it is a good idea to book an extra night or two in each city in case you need to get away and go back to your hotel early.

If you’re extroverted, you may meet people in Croatia and want to spend extra time with them exploring.

No matter your travel style, you won’t regret not rushing through Croatia and actually getting to experience the beautiful country.

Art pavillion in Zagreb. Croatia

6. It is Super Easy to Get Around

No matter your experience level travelling alone, Croatia is a great choice.

It is super easy to travel around the country using public transportation, and once you’re in a city, you can normally walk anywhere you want to go.

If you’re nervous about solo travel in Croatia, don’t be. English is widely spoken, and people are super willing to help you out if you get lost or need advice on what bus to take.

Croatia has an extensive bus network that will get you anywhere you need to go.

The buses are super affordable and run throughout the day. Just be sure to check the departure schedule before you show up at the bus station.

The one important thing to know about public transportation in Croatia is that it doesn’t always run on time.

When I was travelling between Dubrovnik and Split, the bus was running about an hour behind.

I knew what time the bus was supposed to arrive in Split, but the bus station we arrived at during that time didn’t look right. I asked the bus driver if it was Split, and he said no, so I stayed on the bus.

My top tip for taking the bus between cities anywhere in the world is open Google maps before you leave you accommodation and have access to wifi and keep it running in the background.

The blue dot tracking where you are keeps moving and tracking you even when you’re not connected to the internet.

Keep an eye on the blue dot and get off when it says you’re in the city you want to be at.

This is a lifesaver in situations where there aren’t announcements about where you arrived at, and the bus is running late.

You don’t want to get off at the wrong stop and be stuck in a completely different city!

7. Croatia is Extremely Safe (Even for Solo Female Travellers)

Before I visited Croatia in 2015, I heard some misconceptions about the country. Some of the older people in my life were saying it was dangerous to visit Croatia because there were land mines from the Bosnian War.

Well, I went to Croatia anyways and quickly found out Croatia is safe for solo travellers.

Including solo female travellers.

There wasn’t a single moment where I felt unsafe on my solo trip to Croatia. Even when I was walking out and about alone in the evening in the dark.

I felt comfortable, confident, and secure everywhere I went in Croatia.

Safety is not something you have to consider when deciding whether or not to partake in solo travel in Croatia.

It is 100% safe.

Of course, anywhere is as safe as you make it. Something could still happen if you’re not engaging in safe behaviour.

But, for the average solo traveller, it is completely safe to visit Croatia!

Top benefits of travelling alone

solo travel in Europe

8. You Don’t Have to Island Hop to Experience Croatia

A lot of what you see about Croatia on social media is island hopping. People on boats having an amazing time.

Island hopping is definitely part of Croatia, but you don’t need to island hop to experience Croatia.

If you’re like me and don’t like water or socializing, your solo trip to Croatia may not include island hopping. And that’s perfectly okay!

Don’t feel like you have to island hop during solo travel in Croatia.

You can having an amazing trip to Croatia without stepping on a boat or visiting an island.

Your solo trip to Croatia should be what you want it to be not what you think it has to be based on what other people are doing.

Plus, island hopping can get quite expensive (especially as a solo traveller), and you may not have the budget for it.

For me, I would choose visiting Zagreb over island hopping any day of the week.

But the choice is yours!

Make sure you’re having the trip of your dreams and do what suits your personality and interests best.

9. Visit Dubrovnik Old Town in the Morning or Evening

This isn’t just a tip for solo travel in Croatia but travel in Croatia in general.

Old Town Dubrovnik is absurdly busy basically all year around now.

It is packed wall to wall with tourists hunting Game of Thrones filming locations, and it can feel claustrophobic at times.

Shoulder to shoulder with other tourists.

If you want to get the most out of Old Town Dubrovnik, it is best to visit it either first thing in the morning before the rest of the tourists are up for the day or in the evening after dinner.

Or both.

It will still be busy, but it will be significantly less busy than it is during the height of the day. You’ll be able to wander the old town without feeling rushed by the crowds.

You’ll also be able to snag one of those Instagram pictures on the stairs between the old buildings that are so popular nowadays!

If you do visit Old Town Dubrovnik at the height of day, consider doing things that most other tourist aren’t doing.

There are a number of small, hidden museums throughout the old town that many tourists don’t even know exist.

You can purchase a pass to all the old town museums and explore then while the rest of the tourists are exploring the more touristy things to do in the old town.

The same suggestion of visiting the old town during off-peak times applies to every other old town in Croatia.

They just aren’t as busy, so it isn’t as necessary as it is in Dubrovnik.

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La città vecchia, Dubrovnik

The Importance of Internet Safety While Travelling Alone

Everybody talks about physical safety when travelling alone but not enough people talk about the importance of internet safety.

Internet safety is so important when travelling.

You rely on public wifi networks to access the internet, and that leaves your online data, information, and privacy at real risk of being stolen.

And, yes, a hotel or restaurant wifi network with a passcode is still considered a public wifi network since anybody and everybody can get access to the password.

As a solo traveller, it is extra important you take precautions to keep your online information safe.

You’re all alone, and you don’t have anybody to help you if your information is stolen.

What are you going to do if your banking information is stolen, and you have to shut down your credit cards and debit card?

You don’t have a travel companion who can lend you money. You’re all alone and have to figure a way out of a bad situation.

Everybody who travels should take internet safety seriously.

The only way you can be safe and secure while using a public wifi network is by installing a VPN on your devices.

A VPN essentially puts a forcefield around your devices and makes using public wifi as safe as using your home wifi where you’re the only person who knows the password.

Not being internet safe isn’t worth the risk!

My Favourite VPN

As you can probably imagine, I’ve used a lot of different VPN providers during my many years of solo travel.

Time after time I ended up cancelling my VPN subscription after the first year. VPNs are known to slow your devices down, and I would get so frustrated at how slow my internet was that I’d stop using the VPN altogether and put myself at risk.

That all changed when I discovered NordVPN.

NordVPN is the fastest VPN on the market, and that’s why I recommend them to travel lovers.

You get the best of both worlds.

Your devices are protected, but your internet isn’t slowed down.

In my mind, there is no excuse not to install NordVPN on your devices. It costs less than the price of a latte per month, and you can install it on up to six devices.

The peace of mind you get knowing your online information and privacy is protected is worth every single penny (and many pennies more).

My philosophy is that if you can afford to travel, you can afford to protect your online information!

Conclusion

If you’re on the fence about whether solo travel in Croatia is right for you or not, I hope this is the sign you needed to know that it likely is!

Croatia is an amazing country, and nobody I know has ever regretted visiting it.

It is a unique mixture of architecture, history, museums, nature, and modern culture. It is impossible to find anywhere else like it!

Just be sure you keep the tips and tricks included in this post in mind on your solo trip to Croatia.

They’ll help you have the best trip possible and get the most out of your holiday to Croatia!

15 Unforgettable Things to do in London Alone

London is the city I’ve visited most in the world. I absolutely adore it and continue to go back and and time again. There are countless things to do in London alone, so you’ll never get bored no matter how many times you visit the city.

It may seem like a cliche to say London is one of the best cities in the world and everybody should visit at least once in their life. But some things are cliches because they’re true!

The good news is not only are there plenty of things to do alone in London, but the city is very easy for solo travellers to navigate.

Even if it is your first time travelling alone, London isn’t too big of a beast to tackle.

The city is so used to and open to solo tourists. Nobody bats an eye at you if you’re wandering around alone or eating alone.

Close to 40% of London’s population weren’t born in the UK. Even though it is a huge city, it is a melting pot of culture, food, and people.

Taking a solo trip to London is a choice you won’t regret.

If you’ve already decided you want to visit London alone, here are my top things to do in London alone.

There are tons of other things you can do in London by yourself, but I wanted to create a list of places to go alone in London where you won’t feel weird in the slightest being there alone.

As much as I love going for tea in London, that isn’t on the list. It is totally fine to go for tea alone in London, but it may make some newer solo travellers feel uncomfortable.

This list is for both the beginner solo travellers and the experienced solo traveller!

1. Rent a Bike and Ride Around Hyde Park

One of my favourite things to do when I’m travelling alone in London is rent a bike and ride around a park. Hype park is a great option because it is huge and has lots of sights you can stop and look at.

There are bikes you can rent all over London and in multiple places in Hyde park.

You get half an hour free, and then it is quite expensive to pay to use the bike after that.

The good news is that once you return your bike before 30 minutes is up, you can rent another bike 10 minutes later and get 30 minutes for free again!

That’s my sneaky little tip for renting bikes in London and never having to pay! I use this trick quite frequently.

You don’t have to return the bike to the same rental area you got it from. You can return it to any rental rack run by the same company!

There is a little basket on the front of the bike to hold your stuff, and you’re on your way.

Normally, there are quite a few people riding bikes around Hyde Park, so be on the lookout for other bikers, pedestrians, and horses.

Yes. Horses!

Don’t Forget!

Another important thing to remember is that you cannot ride your bike in Kensington Gardens, which are connected to Hyde Park.

Be on the lookout for signs indicating where Kensington Gardens begin, so you don’t break the rules.

One last thing to be aware of is people drive on the left-hand side of the street in London (the opposite side that we drive on in North America).

If you take your bike out on the road, be sure you’re riding the right direction and being safe.

I’m not going to share my horror story of accidentally coming across a roundabout when biking in London and trying to sort out how to use it on the fly going the opposite direction I’m used to!

Needless to say, that was the end of my biking for the day, and I walked my bike back to the nearest return rack.

Hyde Park

2. Visit the Queen’s Gallery

The Queen’s Gallery is one of the most underrated attractions in all of London, and I think it is one of the best things to do in London alone.

The Queen’s Gallery is right next door to Buckingham Palace and is a gallery where the Queen displays items from her personal collection.

The exhibit changes quarterly, and you get to see artwork and artifacts you would never otherwise be able to see since they’re straight out of the Queen’s private collection.

I’ve been there a number of times and had the chance to see some incredible collections including a Leonardo da Vinci collection that included original hand drawings.

Yeah. That was absolutely incredible.

The reason I think this is such a great thing for you to do in London by yourself is because everybody is listening to the audioguide and moving at their own pace.

Even people who come in groups get separated throughout the gallery and meet at the end.

If you’re hesitant about travelling alone, not a single soul will notice you’re alone. And if they do, they’ll simply assume the rest of your group is somewhere else in the gallery.

Plus, the Queen’s Gallery is super affordable, and if you get the back of your ticket stamped, you can reenter the gallery for free whenever you want for a year.

If you’re lucky, you just might be able to catch one exhibit the first day you’re in London and a new exhibit at the end of your trip.

It is rare for that to happen, but if it does, count yourself extremely lucky!

Get over your fear of solo travel

3. Visit a Free Museum

There are 20 free museums in London for you to explore!

There are art museums, history museums, science museums, museums about the City of London, museums about the banks, library, and so much more.

No matter what you’re interested in, there will be a free museum you can wander around for a few hours and explore.

It is so nice that there are so many free museums throughout the city. It is a nice break from paying for some of the most expensive attractions like the Tower of London.

Give your wallet a bit of a rest!

Some of my favourite museums are located in the Kensington area. The Natural History Museum and Victoria and Albert Museum are right next to one another and are two of my favourites in London.

Another hugely popular free museum in London is the British Museum. It is always back full, and you can see some of the most unique artifacts in the world.

Museums are some of the best places to go alone in London because people are so absorbed in exploring the museum that they don’t pay attention to what is going on around them.

If you go during a weekday day, it will likely be pretty quiet and full of school groups. They’re busy running around doing their projects and don’t care about you.

They can get a bit loud and aggressive at times though so be aware of them. I like to leave the room if there are a bunch of little children running about. Come back later, and it’ll be a much more enjoyable experience.

Museums are often a good place to find free wifi in London so keep that in mind if you’re ever in a pinch and in dire need of internet access.

British Musem

4. Tour the House of Parliament

Just like the Queen’s Gallery, touring the House of Parliament is one of the most underrated things to do in London.

You get to go inside Westminster (not the church but the big famous building that has Big Ben) and tour around the actual place bills and laws are debated in the UK.

Before you start dozing off, it is actually quite interesting!

You can either take a guided group tour or go on a self-guided 90-minute audio tour. The audio tour is what I did and what I recommend for solo travellers.

It gives you more freedom to go at your own pace compared to taking a guided group tour.

There are only limited days you can tour the House of Parliament, so I recommend buying your ticket online in advance. You can also show up at the ticket office across the street from Westminster right outside the metro station and try to snag a last-minute ticket.

I will admit that touring the House of Parliament is a bit expensive (as most sights in London are).

Tickets range from £19 to £29 depending on what type of ticket you qualify for. You can find a list of ticket types and prices here.

This is a surprisingly fun and unique way to spend an afternoon in Central London.

Even if you’re not too into politics, the inside of the House of Parliament is stunning and well worth the price of admission alone.

You also learn about a number of interesting historical events that took place in the building.

All in all, this is definitely something you should considering doing when alone in London if you have the money and can get a ticket.

5. Take in a West End Show

One of the best things you can do alone in London as night is go to a West End show. I go to at least one show every time I’m in London and absolutely love it every single time!

The West End is similar to New York’s Broadway. There are dozens of theatres in the district, and you can choose from a wide variety of different shows.

I don’t recommend you purchase your tickets in advance through the theatre unless there is a specific show you’re dying to see.

There are two different ways to get discount theatre tickets either the day of the show or a day or two before it:

  • TKTS booth in Leicester Square
  • TodayTix app

I personally use the app 99% of the time. It is so convenient, and you can book your tickets on your phone from wherever you are and not have to worry about going all the way to Leicester Square.

Not only that, but the TKTS booth often has a long line to get tickets. It isn’t uncommon for you to waste an hour or so waiting in line to get tickets.

That just isn’t how I want to be spending my time in London!

With TKTS, you get your tickets right at the booth when you purchase them.

With TodayTix, you have to pick up your tickets at the box office at the theatre. Be sure to arrive at the theatre early enough to get your ticket and bring photo ID.

I’ve never had a problem collecting tickets when I purchase through the TodayTix app.

I just walk up to the box office, say I’m collecting my tickets, and they give them to me!

West End Show, London

A Word of Warning

I’ll always encourage you to go to a West End show. They’re absolutely fabulous and a fun way to spend a night alone in London.

However, there is one thing you need to be aware of, and that is intermission.

I always feel a bit weird during intermission because there is never any wifi in the theatres, and I can’t scroll around on my phone.

I just sit there and wait for the show to begin again.

So, if you’re going to a West End show alone, have a plan to make the intermission time fly by!

Bring a book, go for a walk around the theatre, or grab a snack or drink.

Many London hotels provide guests with a complimentary smart phone they can use during their stay.

If you’re lucky enough to stay at a hotel that offers this, catch up on the news or random Google searches. You won’t be able to access your social media, but at least you have a phone to keep you distracted!

Lastly, if you’re a frequent traveller, you may want to consider investing in a Solis wifi device.

It is your own personal pocket wifi device that gives you access to the internet pretty much anywhere and everywhere you go.

There are a few countries it doesn’t work in, but it does work in the UK.

You always have access to the internet, can scroll social media, keep in touch with family and friends, and use Google Maps to your heart’s content (big selling feature for me).

I got my Solis in 2019 and adore it.

Be sure to use code TRAVELSWITHERICA for 10% off your purchase if you decide it is the right internet solution for you and your travels!

6. Join a Free Walking Tour

Free walking tours are one of the best things to do in any city you visit! You get to explore part of the city with a local tour guide, and it doesn’t cost you anything except a tip.

Please be sure to always tip your free tour guides! The only money they make is from your tips!

There are tons of free walking tours in London, and you can find a free walking tour for pretty much any interest you have!

There are tours about Jack the Ripper, Harry Potter, WWII, Graffiti, different areas of London, and, of course, the royal family and history.

You can choose from a variety of different tour operators based on what you want to see and what time works best for you.

I’ve used Free Tours by Foot a number of times in London and have had a good experience each time.

But I’m sure you’ll have a great experience no matter who you go with!

This is without a doubt one of the best things to do in London alone because you’re joining a group of other tourist and listening to a guide.

There will be a lot of people on your tour, and it is easy to stay at the back of the pack and go unnoticed if you want.

Free walking tours are also a great way to meet other travellers. Many people who join free walking tours are younger, and you may be able to meet some people to tour around with for the rest of the day.

No matter what, I highly recommend taking a free walking tour near the start of your trip.

I’ve been on countless free walking tours all over the world, and they provide so much valuable information about the city you’re visiting you wouldn’t otherwise have.

A free walking tour can put a city in a whole new perspective and give you a new way of looking at it for the rest of your trip.

Big Ben, London, UK

7. Visit Kensington Palace and Explore the Gardens

Kensington Palace and its gardens are a very interesting thing to do in London. If you have any interest in the royal family or the history of the royal family, this should be a must-do for anybody visiting London.

You get to tour various parts of the palace including the King and Queen’s sleeping rooms, ball rooms, and art rooms.

There are also limited time exhibits that often feature outfits worn by royal family members.

Kensington Palace is a unique opportunity to learn quite a bit about royal history and the modern royals.

Kensington Palace is a popular attraction, so you’ll want to purchase your ticket online in advance.

You can just show up to the palace the day you want to visit, but there is a good chance all the reservations are full, and you won’t be able to tour the palace.

Even if you don’t want to go inside the palace, you should spend some time walking around the gardens.

They are huge and feature a lot of unique sights and statues for both royals from long ago and more recent royal family members.

Kensington Gardens connects to Hyde Park, so you can easily visit both in a single day.

Kensington Palace may seem like one of the odder places to go alone in London, but, trust me, it is worth the visit.

True, there isn’t an audio guide you can hide behind like some of the other attractions, but, just like the rest of the museums, people will assume you’ve just separated from your group.

If they even notice you at all!

Don’t let being nervous about being a solo traveller in London hold you back from visiting the sights you want to see!

Things to do in Kensington

Kensington Palace

8. People Watch in Trafalgar Square

I love people watching, and there isn’t a better place in London to people watch than Trafalgar Square.

It is a hub for tourists, street performers, and all things odd and interesting.

Grab a coffee to go and sit near Trafalgar Square while you drink it. You never know what you’ll see.

The square often has a number of pop-up events and markets, so you may get to experience an even more unique side of London.

Trafalgar Square is definitely full of tourist and not a place you’ll find many locals, but it is an interesting place to take a quick break, watch tourists, watch a few street performers, and take in the hustle and bustle of the area before you move onto somewhere else.

It is a just a short walk from Westminster on the way to the West End and China Town.

Most tourist will naturally walk through the area, so you may as well slow down and enjoy the chaos.

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9. Take a Day Trip

London is such a small taste of what the UK has to offer. It is super tempting to stay in London and explore everything it has to offer, but you should consider taking a day trip.

There are tons of cities you can visit on a day trip from London that only take a few hours to get to by train or bus.

My top picks are Brighton, York, and Bath.

All three cities give you a taste of a different side of the UK and gets you out of the hustle and bustle of the city.

If you can only choose one, I highly recommend Brighton. I love it so much!

Taking a day trip outside London may seem intimidating when you’re travelling alone in London, but it is actually super easy.

You just need to hop on the train, get off, wander around the city, and hop on the train again when it is time to leave.

Not only is taking a day trip one of the best things to do alone in London, but it also helps you develop your solo travel skills and become a more confident traveller!

41 things to do along the Brighton Seafront

10. Go Back in Time at the Globe

I never miss the chance to watch a show at the Globe if there is one playing when I’m in London. It is an exact recreation of Shakespeare’s Globe, and they put on authentic Shakespearian plays.

Now, I’m not a Shakespeare fan, but there is something completely different about sitting in the Globe watching a Shakespeare play. It is so much fun!

You should purchase your tickets in advance. I like to pay for a seat, but many people choose to pay for the cheapest ticket and stand in front of the stage.

That gives you the best view, but you also have to be at the theatre super early to get a good spot and have to stand before the show, throughout the show, and during intermission.

It is definitely a young person’s game.

If you’re not in London when there is a play running, you can take a tour of the Globe.

You get to go behind the scenes and learn about the history of the building and Shakespeare.

Both are super fun, but if you can only choose one, see a show. It is worth every pence you pay for it!

Globe Theatre London

11. Tour HMS Belfast

This is another hidden gem in London and one of the best things to do in London alone.

I adore the HMS Belfast. I actually stumbled upon it by accident the third time I was in London and was looking for unique attraction I’d never done before.

Boy am I glad I found this one!

The HMS Belfast is the most significant surviving WWII Navy Warship, and it shot some of the first shots at the D-Day landings.

It is one of the most interesting things to do in London, but so few people know about it.

The ship sits in the River Thames right in front of Tower Bridge and across from the Tower of London.

Tens of thousands of tourists look at the ship every year and have no idea what they’re missing out on.

You get an audioguide and weave your way through the ship exploring all the levels and learning about what life on the HMS Belfast was like.

I promise even if you’re not into this sort of thing, you’ll have an amazing time and be so glad you did it!

You don’t need to reserve your tickets in advance because it is such an underrated London attraction.

You can show up pretty much whenever you want and tour the ship.

Just like the Queen’s Gallery, it is an audio tour, so nobody will notice if you’re standing in front of an area all by yourself. They’ll simply thing the rest of your group is ahead or behind you and not bat an eye.

Plus, they’re so involved in their own tour that they likely won’t even give you a second thought at all.

Everything you need to know about the Oyster Card (and why it is essential to have one)

HMS Belfast, London

12. Walk Along the Thames

The river Thames is one of the most iconic sights in London but so few people take the time to take in its beauty.

A lot of London’s top attractions are near (or on) the Thames, and you should take a little extra time to walk along the Thames.

There are plenty of cafés and restaurants along the Thames. Sit down, have a cup of coffee, and appreciate the Thames.

There is so much history mixed in with the Thames. It has played a huge role in London and the UK’s history, and it deserves to be appreciated.

You can even take a boat ride along the Thames if you want to see more than just what you can cover by foot.

My personal opinion is that walking along the Thames is sufficient, but you may think otherwise!

13. Watch the Changing of the Guards Ceremony

Watching the changing of the guards ceremony is a classic thing to do in London.

The actual ceremony is quite a long, drawn out process that takes about 45 minutes, but you don’t need to (even be able to) see the entire ceremony.

The part you want to watch is the changing of the guards at Buckingham Palace, and that takes place at 11am.

You’ll want to get there early though to get a good view! 10:45 should be plenty of time to get a prime view, and 10:50 will get you a decent view.

The best viewing area is near the Victoria statue right in front of the palace. The second best is along Marlborough Road, so you can watch the guards marching before the changing over ceremony.

Don’t be nervous about watching the ceremony alone. The people around you will be chatting with their friends and family and won’t even notice you.

If they do, they’ll either assume you’re saving a spot for the rest of your group or strike up a conversation with you.

This is one of those things to do alone in London that some people are nervous about, but you shouldn’t be.

You don’t want to miss out on an iconic London experience just because you’re a little shy about being there alone!

Changing of the guards, London

14. Window Shop on Oxford Street

Oxford street is one of the most famous shopping streets in London. It is filled with both big brands and small shop owners.

There is plenty to see and do on Oxford street even if you don’t spend a dime.

In fact, I think window shopping on Oxford street is one of the best things to do in London alone. You get to people watch and blend in like a local going about their own shopping.

Plus you get to pop in and out of stores to see what is in style or perhaps find a unique gift to bring home to a loved one.

I like to get off the main street and wander around some of the side streets. You get out of the hustle and bustle, and that’s where you’ll find the most unique and local items!

Oxford street is within walking distance of the British Museum, so you can plan to visit both in a single day!

15. Spend a Morning at Camden Market

Camden Market is one of the most popular things to do in London for both tourists and locals alike.

It is located near Regent’s Canal and has over 1,000 stalls selling everything and everything you could dream of.

From music to fashion to food, Camden Market has it all!

It is quite busy, so I recommend going earlier in the day on a weekday to not feel so claustrophobic and be able to move around easier.

The market opens at 10am everyday, so try to get there as close to opening time as possible.

Grab a drink and spend a few hours wandering around the market. It is one of the best things to do in London by yourself, and you won’t regret it!

Food Stall in Camden Market

Conclusion

As you can see, there are tons of things you can do in London alone.

London is truly one of the most welcoming cities to solo travellers, and it is a great city to start your solo travel journey in.

I 100% believe you shouldn’t let travelling alone hold you back from anything you want to do.

Your uncomfortable feeling will disappear once you’re experiencing the attraction. You’ll regret it in the long run if you don’t visit the attraction you’re dying to see.

All of the things to do alone in London on this list are very easy for beginner solo travellers. Nobody will care that you’re alone, and nobody will bat an eye at you.

But, these aren’t the only things to do alone in London. Anything you would be keen on doing with a friend or family member can easily be done alone.

I challenge you to put aside the fact that you’re travelling alone and plan your dream vacation to London!

It truly is one of the best cities in the world!